Prenatal Massage in NYC- What New York Mom’s need to know

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Prenatal Massage in NYC- What New York Mom’s need to know

Getting a Prenatal Massage in NYC? Here are the top five things pregnant working women in New York need to know!

New York city is a fantastic place, full of energy. There is a reason we call it the city that never sleeps! But that same energy may not be so amazing for New York’s expectant moms-to-be.  The average American work week is a bit over 40 hours a week however a report from The New York office City Controller in 2015  showed that the average work week in NYC was 42.40 hours, which is right on par with most other major metropolitan areas.

But the report also showed that New Yorkers are commuting longer than most workers to get to where they are going. With the work time and commute time combined New York City full-time workers spend over 49 hours per week either working or commuting, giving them the longest combined work week in the nation”. This means, “The difference in the length of the work week for people living in New York City and some of the nation’s mid-sized cities is substantial. For example, the average combined work and commuting week in New York City is about 4 hours and 15 minutes longer than in Milwaukee.  The result: for each workday New Yorkers have some 50 minutes less to be with family or engage in other pursuits than their counterparts in Milwaukee.”

So it’s no wonder services like prenatal massage, where working moms-to-be can rest, relax, and manage pain, are popular in the Big Apple. Women seeking prenatal massage are often dealing with balancing an active life, work and possible complications from their pregnancy. For many women it might be the first time they have sought out massage and so they are full of questions. To answer those questions, here are the top 5 things pregnant New Yorkers need to know about prenatal massage in New York.

1.   Can prenatal massage aid in stress and pain management? Prenatal massage offers a lot of benefits to a new or experienced mom-on-the-go. While there are some pretty wild claims out there about what massage can and cannot do for pregnant women, it’s pretty safe to say that having a place to go once a week where they are encouraged to take time to rest, have their achy body rubbed and gently stretch things they cannot stretch themselves, is probably a great plan for stress management. And since higher stress can often amplify pain responses, you might call it a drug free pain management plan too.  It means you get to say “I have somewhere to go if it all gets to be too much”.

2.  Should I check with my doctor? Does insurance cover prenatal massage? For most women massage at ANY time during pregnancy is a-OK but there are a few rarely-occurring conditions that do sideline you from a little massage love, so you should definitely check if that applies to you. Since you are going in regularly for checkups in preparation for your new bundle you might as well ask. Checking with your doctor has some added benefits, too. Some folks have HSA and FSA that covers massage, so if yours does, you can have the doctor write a note and your massage might be covered by insurance. It will depend completely on your personal insurance situation, but it never hurts to ask.

3.  I heard I couldn’t get a massage while I was pregnant, is this true? While we are talking about medical things we might as well mention that there are some pretty interesting myths out there on prenatal massage. The first myth is that you cannot have a massage in your first trimester of pregnancy, but as we mentioned above, so long as massage is cleared with your doctor and you do not have any medical conditions that prohibit it, that’s not true. There are also some funny old wives tales still kicking around that say women should not have their ankles and feet massaged during pregnancy because it can induce birth. Again: not true. If you love a good foot rub after your long train ride go for it. Another big one is that you cannot get a prenatal massage from a male therapist. So long as you’re comfortable with it, there is no reason a male therapist cannot give you the best prenatal massage of your life. If he is available, I would say go for it!

pregnancy table for massage in nyc
Prenatal Massage Table

4. What if I am uncomfortable, need to move or only want my back massaged? Whatever kind of massage you book, know that this is your time. The therapist’s job is to keep you safe and make decisions that keep you out of harm’s way, but the actual massage, and how it is done, is up to you. Deep pressure, light pressure, only wanting your feet rubbed, or only your legs, it does not matter. It is your time, feel free to speak up about your comfort and desires. The therapist may have a fancy table that lets you lie face down, but if you don’t want to, or are not comfortable in anyway, do not do it! The majority of prenatal massages in NYC are done in a side lying position with pillows. If you’re not comfortable, speak up and the therapist will make adjustments-this includes leaving to go to the ladies room. Go ahead, we are used to it!

5. How do I know if the therapist is qualified to do prenatal massage?  New York has one of the highest educational standards for massage therapy in all of the United States. The New York State educational requirements are 1000 hours so you are in good hands.  To see if you are visiting a licensed practitioner who has an education approved by the state you can look up their license here; NY State Massage License look up.  Finding a licensed practitioner is the best thing you can do to make sure you have a safe, enjoyable experience. Once you find someone, continue to ask a few questions. Although New York State has a much higher educational standard than other states, that does not mean your therapist will be experienced in prenatal massage. If the therapist is a new graduate the therapist could be working on a permit (before they get the results of their test) and most schools give only a cursory introduction to prenatal massage. Look for someone who specializes in prenatal services. Just because a spa lists it, does not mean that the therapist is experienced. Ask how long the therapist has been performing prenatal massage and what special training they took. Or you can go to one of New York’s many specialized treatment centers geared to prenatal massage.

To book an appointment with our prenatal specialist, don’t be shy! You can find more information about our prenatal massage here.  Or check our our prenatal tips page or postnatal tips page. Give us a visit at:

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage
315 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10017
(212)-600-4808

Strength & Conditioning for the Cyclist

 

By Ivan Garay LMT/CPT

Strength training can improve a cyclist’s performance and protect against injuries. Research on endurance athletes shows that strength training improves the three most important predictors of endurance sports performance[1]: economy (the ability to do a certain amount of work using as small amount of energy as possible), velocity/power at maximal oxygen uptake (How fast you can pedal on your endurance races), and velocity at maximal anaerobic running threshold (How fast you can sprint before burning out at top speed).

When designing a strength training program.You must first focus on correcting any imbalances in posture and movement patterns. The prolonged bent over position on the bicycle and miles of pedaling create common muscle imbalances in cyclist. They include tight/shortened muscles, the calves, psoas, quadriceps, hamstrings, lumbar spine, pectorals, upper trapezius, and neck flexor muscles. Along with these shortened muscles,there are weak/lengthened muscles, the tibialis anterior, gluteus maximus, abdominals, rhomboids, middle and lower trapezius, and neck extensor muscles.

Below is a sample routine that will balance muscles and improve cyclers posture:

First release tight muscles with foam rolling or active stretching:
Calves, psoas, quadriceps, hamstrings, lumbar spine, pectorals, upper trapezius, neck flexor muscles.

Follow by strengthening the weak muscles with resistance exercise:

  • Ankle Dorsiflexion with Cable or Tube Resistance
  • Barbell or Dumbbell Deadlift
  • Bridges
  • Dumbbell Rows with Shoulder Blades Squeezed (this exercises will reduce middle and upper back pain and soreness from long rides)
  • Neck Extension in a Quadruped Position (It will reduce neck pain from prolonged forward head position)
  • Planks
  • Side Planks

Brace your abdominals with every exercise. To perform an abdominal brace, pull your bellybutton toward your spine, tighten your abs without moving your body (as if you were about to be punched in the stomach).

Perform each exercise for 2 sets of 12-20 repetitions for muscular endurance.

Current research recommends that to increase cycling performance heavy strength training at maximal velocity[2] should be performed with multiple leg exercises for periods of greater than 6 weeks [3]. During a cycler’s off-season, high volume strength training should be performed two to three times a week and each exercise should be done for two to three sets for four to ten repetitions. You should rest two to three minutes between sets. Maximal results usually occur after an 8-12 week cycle of training. During competitive season your training volume should be reduced to 1 session a week with a lower volume of exercises but with the same high intensity to maintain strength gained from your off-season program[4].

Pick a heavy weight with each exercise and move as fast as you can during the concentric phase (lifting phase) and slow down during the eccentric phase (lowering phase of the exercise).

Off-Season Routine

  • One-Legged Squat
  • Barbell DeadliftDumbbell lunges
  • Standing Calve Raises
  • Barbell Rows
  • Seated Calve Raises
  • Chin-Ups
  • Bench Press
  • Barbell Shoulder Press
  • Dips
  • Dumbbell curls
  • Back Extensions
  • Planks
  • Side Planks

Competitive Season Routine

  • Barbell Front Squat
  • Standing Calve Raises
  • Barbell Rows
  • Bench Press
  • Dips
  • Dumbbell Curls
  • Planks

[1] http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-013-2586-y
See Reference Page for article citation

[2] http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-013-2586-y
See Reference Page for article citation

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23914932
See Reference Page for Article citation

[4] http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-010-1622-4
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2009.01035.x/abstract;jsessionid=8DA506016E22EA58C549B269A3F70D81.f03t03?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false
See Reference Page for Article citation

Running Season– Treating Plantar Fasciitis

Exercises for Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis is one of the most common foot complaints. Technically what is happening is the plantar fascia is being over stretched or over taxed
Beret Kirkeby, “Treating Plantar Fasciitis”

plantar

Exercise for plantar fasciitis should reduce excessive strain on the plantar fascia and correct biomechanical faults that contribute to plantar fasciitis. Common biomechanical faults include over-pronation, flat feet, a tight Achilles tendon (especially from tight soleus muscles), excessive weight, and a high-arched foot. These imbalances are corrected with the right mix of stretching and strengthening exercises that bring the foot and ankle into correct functional alignment and movement. First, a general exercise routine for all people suffering from plantar fasciitis will be explained; followed by corrective exercise routines for specific common biomechanical imbalances.

General Routine

Before discussing targeted corrective exercises, most everyone with plantar fasciitis will benefit from relieving the strain from a tight Achilles tendon.  But because the body works as a whole, it’s important to not only stretch/work the muscle that directly attach to the Achilles tendon, but also the rest of the posterior chain muscles. (please see link for graphic) Treatment would start at the gluteal muscles, hamstrings, and then the calf. The figure below is the posterior chain of muscles that connect to the Achilles tendon. If you are seeking treatment for plantar fasciitis, it is important to note that it it begins in the hips. It is a common misunderstanding that it is the feet causing the issue. While the feet clearly play a role, the focus of treatment is not specifically the feet unless you are utilizing orthotics or working on foot mobility.

achilles-tendon

Imbalance or dysfunction in any segment of the posterior chain can produce excessive tightening of the Achilles tendon, so it is important to stretch each segment individually first and than end with a full posterior chain stretch like the Downward Dog yoga pose.
The following exercises are recommended in this order:

First, Stretch the Soleus (lower calve)soleus

Second, Stretch the Gastrocniemius (upper calve)
upper-calve

Third, Stretch the Hamstrings
hamstrings
Fourth, Stretch the Erector Spinae
erector-spinae

End with the Downward Dog Pose (will also treat the gluteus muscles)
downward-dog-pose

It’s best to use the Active-Isolated Stretching technique on each segment and end with holding the Downward Dog pose for 30-60 seconds. If you are unfamiliar with Active-Isolated Stretching, visit: http://www.stretchingusa.com/active-isolated-stretching

Exercises for Specific Biomechanical Faults

To understand biomechanical faults, let’s first look at the walking cycle. In a perfect walking stride, the person’s arch elevator muscles of the leg (tibias anterior, peroneus longus and tibialis posterior) work in perfect harmony with the plantar-flexors (gastric, soleus, etc.) to absorb, distribute and release stored kinetic energy. On heel strike, the arch elevators must fire eccentrically to decelerate and dissipate ground reaction forces via foot pronation and internal tibial rotation.

As the foot transitions from midstance into push-off, the toes begin to dorsiflex causing activation of the plantar fascia and associated muscles.

But if the muscles of the leg and ankle are imbalanced, the forces acting on the foot and ankle are not evenly distributed. This often results in excessive strain to the plantar fascia. Over pronation, a common problem causes excessive strain on the plantar fascia and often leads to flat feet.

Over Pronation and Flat Feet
pronation

If you are over pronating your plantar flexor muscles are often stronger and tighter than your arch elevator muscles. The arch elevator muscles of the leg (tibias anterior, peroneus longus and tibialis posterior) need to be strengthened. The following two exercises help to strengthen these weaker muscles.

ankle-inversion

An elastic band, rubber tubing, or cable machine are all good choices to provide resistance. Start the ankle inversion exercise in neutral and fully invert your foot slowly. Do 3 sets of 20 to 30 reps. The second exercise is for flat feet:

excersice-pronation

Sit on a chair so that your knees are at an approximate 90-degree angle with your feet on the ground. You’ll need a smooth floor so that the towel will glide easily. Spread the length of the towel in front of you and sit with your back straight and bare foot flat on the edge of the towel. The short end of the towel should be against the legs of the chair. Without moving your heel, contract your toes to bunch up the towel and draw it toward you (as shown) until you have done 2 sets of 10-20 repetitions of toe contractions or run out of towel. As the exercise becomes easier over time, begin adding a light weight to the end of the towel.

Excessive Supination and High Arch

ankle-eversion

Like the inversion exercise, a Thera-Band, tubing or cable machine will work well. Do 3 sets of 20 to 30 reps and move slowly throughout the range of motion. The second exercise for high arches involves a tennis or golf ball to release the muscles on the plantar surface of the foot.

ball-stretch

Place the ball under your foot and move the ball back and forth 20-40 times. Repeat on other foot (Note: roll only on the non-painful part of the arch, if the entire surface of foot is painful, avoid this exercise).

If you have any questions or comments on this topic, make sure to post them on our blog or email us directly.

Fitness information provided by Ivan Garay, a personal trainer. To book an appoinment for personal training, please contact his website: http://ivangaray.massagetherapy.com/

TMJ Home Care

We have had so many requests for this and finally have put it together. One of the things we really stress with clients is that for chronic pain conditions WE DO NOT WANT TO SEE YOU. We really want you to get better. Getting better comes from work on our part and on yours. We put together this homecare information for TMJ to help you out between visits. Please remember that if you are unsure of your condition, visit a doctor and get a proper check up. If you have any questions for us we are always available.

Quadriceps Stretch

How often do you put your leg behind you? ahhhh almost never. If you can get it there you should though. Multi-directional movement is the key to muscle health. Our bodies are made to squat, kneel and do all sorts of things we dont really do because we are stuck behind a desk in an ergonomic chair…it is the perfect reason to stretch your quads…that and they might be tight.

Lunges and Deep Belly Stretching

Lunges work not just the quads but the deep belly including psoas. The benefit of this kind of movement goes beyond stretching and into organ stimulation. Anytime you tighten up and move muscles that go through the belly you get a nice belly massage which is great for organ health, digestion and function.

Pectoralis Stretch

In todays computer filled environment, almost everyone could use a good pec stretch. Sitting in at your desk for hours at a time often results in rounded shoulders. Many complain of back pain and seek treatment in the form of a back massage, but really what they are feeling is an over stretching of the back muscles between the shoulderblades as the shoulders migrate around the back more anteriorly and give the pecs room to shorten across the front. Once a muscle is contracted, such as the pectoralis in this case, no matter how hard you try, you won’t be able to pull your shoulders back. Give yourself the gift of relief. Try a pec stretch today!!

Rotator Cuff Stretches

In todays day and age we spend a lot of time reaching for things. It could be caring for your baby who is full of joy, or reaching for that heavy law book that you kind of use as a door stop sometimes. Whatever the case, our rotator cuffs can take a huge beating. Here we show you how to stretch them. Give yourself a one armed hug! Go ahead! You deserve it!