massage therapy Archives - Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage : Sports Massage and Massage Therapy New York City

Meditation of Touching

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Meditation of Touching

Photo by Levi XU on Unsplash
Photo by Levi XU

In the course of my training as a yoga therapist I have learned a fair amount of new information about pain, stress management, and relaxation. With these new skills under my belt, my massage therapy goals have changed.

I can particularly see this in the massage therapy education that I pass on to staff and students. The techniques stay the same but the application and information changes.

Right now I am particularly focused on a return to fundamentals like ‘rate and rhythm’, something I think is often overlooked. It sounds like a weird thing for someone with “orthopedic massage’ in their title to be grooving over rate and rhythm. Most people would assume I would be filling my treatments with what some refer to as ‘advanced massage techniques’. They are, in limited doses, if appropriate, but mostly we are trying to make a nice pattern in a larger sequence.

It is one of the ways I am trying to tap into interacting with the nervous system. Brains like to know what happens next so predictable patterning makes them happy. At the very least they are not wasting time trying to figure out what is coming next…and that stillness of mind is very valuable.

If you’re into meditation, there is a very well known technique called a body scan. That mediation is specific to relaxing the body and putting people into a deep relaxed state. It uses a pattern that goes something like this:

‘Focus on the tip of your thumb, let the thumb get heavy, let it go. Focus on all the fingers, let the fingers get heavy, let it go. Focus on the palm of the hand, let the palm get heavy, let it go. Focus on the whole hand, let the whole hand get heavy, let it go. Focus on the forearm, let the forearm get heavy, let it go. Now focus on the hand and the forearm, let them both get heavy, let it go.’

It goes on to cover the whole body in that manner, repeating patterns. If you’re a massage therapist, that pattern might ring a few bells for you. It is pretty similar to the concepts of ‘general, specific, general’ and ‘distal, proximal, distal’. A well-formed patterned massage is running through a body scan of touch.

If you have properly controlled your space for someone, and created a safe place to relax and focus on the sensory experience at hand, you may be guiding them into a meditative state. That is an odd thing considering most scopes of practice deal primarily with muscles and skin rather than the nervous system.

Is that all that massage is? Of course not, massage covers a lot of areas in what people are ‘doing’ in treatment, but it is one of the many things you can do provided you do it well. If this all sounds super-strange to you, you you can listen to this 6 min body scan as an example.

Don’t Tell Me to Relax

Relax….

You book the massage appointment. You take the risk. It is a financial stretch but you have to do something because you have not been able to manage on your own. You lay down on the table. The massage therapist says “Take a deep breath…Relax…”

In the last few years I have become very conscious of what I say to people. As I have gotten older I have given less ‘%#@’s’ about some things and more about others. One of the things I have given more about is how I might accidentally harm someone whom I am caring for. That fills two categories; people I treat, and the people I teach to treat.

I primarily work with massage patients in  pain. Frequently those people have the kind of pain that has been untreated, underestimated, and has fallen through the medical cracks. They are sometimes angry, vulnerable, difficult to deal with, as well as they are often generous beyond belief, humble, and full of hope. They come in all forms and shapes and sizes…but what they have in common frequently is they cannot relax. This may pertain to their whole body, or a single part…but if they could simply relax and gain control of whatever they are seeing me for, they would have done it long ago.

And so, it really bothers me when people say ‘relax‘. It has become somewhat of a trigger word because, what I hear is the response: “Don’t you think I would if I could? I booked an appointment specifically because I need HELP relaxing, and here you are telling me to relax, when I have admitted, I can’t”. In fact, in my case being told to relax, specifically makes me more anxious. I am pretty sure every dentist I have ever known has said “take a deep breath and relax” right before he has done something awful.

I think in terms of massage therapy, the word relax is old, is loaded and full of harm. It is like a brand that has ceased to have meaning to us, and yet has become the only word we use. For people looking for a spa day, it may have no connotation, but for many it could be one of the worst things I say to them all day.

While it is hard to watch your words all the time, I have tried to omit relax completely from my massage practice. I had to think for a bit on what exactly should take its place. Frequently I am communicating a lot with people on how an area feels to them, and I will ask whether or not they felt a tone drop in an area or if that is my perception- ie ‘should I move on? Do you feel more comfortable now? And then, of course, the old stand by word “release” pops up. I am not a big lover of the “release” description either. What has been released? Certainly I am releasing nothing…something might be relaxing…but then there is that word again!

Neither word is the correct thing I want to say to anyone, but those two words are flung about, both of them holding too much meaning, and way too little at the same time. What I want is to give someone an actionable word or words, that they have control of, something that removes my hands from the picture, other than to bring awareness. The words I want to use need to suggest that they have self efficacy in a process that I am creating a space for. And so for the moment, I have settled on “Let go” or “Be heavy”.  As in, “I am going to be gently moving you around for a moment, and so there is no resistance, I would like you to try to let go of that area/practice being heavy, but if you cannot, that is okay…we can just move together for a little while and it will be just as good.”

 

Five Things Your New York State Massage Therapist Should be Doing for You

We have put together the top 5 things your New York State Massage Therapist, should be doing for you but may not be….

This blog post is specific to New York State Massage Therapy, but in any state that see’s massage therapy as a licensed medical profession, these may apply. We put together this list of important bullet points in order to educate the public about their rights. Massage therapist undergo training in order to become professionals, but the public is often unaware of what that training is or what their rights are. So here it goes, here are our top five things your New York State licensed Massage Therapist should be doing for you.

1. Giving you a full consent before you are treated or assessed

What is consent you ask? It is your agreement to the treatment, assessment, or procedure that is about to be performed. It can be both verbal and written. Consent can cover the type of treatment for massage (for example: trigger point therapy, stretching, or Swedish massage), how it is performed, what products or tools may be used (for example lotions or graston tools), and even as far as what smells you might encounter. The bottom line is, you have full control over what happens to you, even if you have not been made aware of it. What does this mean for you in real time? At the very least you should be looking for a Massage Therapist who gives you a rundown of what they are going to do before they do it, a little snapshot so to speak. This rundown, not only keeps you safe but also ends up in making you happier over all with your massage because you can actually relax.

2. Protecting your right to privacy

In New York state, Massage Therapists are considered Medical Professionals. They are required by law to protect your privacy. If you find your therapist is particularly chatty about their other patients, it may be time to move on.

The New York State Massage law reads as follows:Massage therapists will safeguard the confidentiality of all patient/client information, including patient/client records, unless disclosure is required by law or court order. Any situation which requires the revelation of confidential information should be clearly delineated in records of massage therapists.

3. You have the full right to refuse, modify, or change the treatment at any time. 

Ever have the feeling you have made a terrible mistake, part way through something? It happens, even with massage. It is totally ok to stop once you start. Individual clinics may have policy’s on if you will pay or not based on stopping treatment so you may want to check, but generally if you encounter a medical problem, such as feeling dizzy, we waive all fees at our clinic. Fee aside, you can always simply stop regardless of the situation. If you just think that it is not working out, you can always change the plan too. If your therapists pressure is not right, tell them…or redirect the treatment entirely so it works on what you just figured out you want. A 30 minute back massage can easily become a 25 minute foot massage. Do it, it is your right.

New York State Massage law reads as follows: Massage therapists will respect the patient’s/client’s right to refuse, modify or terminate treatment, regardless of prior consent for such treatment.

4. Referring you out

Is your therapist Mr/Ms fix it? It is fantastic that you found a great therapist. Massage Therapists cannot wear all health care hats however. As a Massage Therapist we cannot diagnose or treat disease, so if you genuinely have a medical issue no one has seen you for, your therapist should refer you out. Vibrant clinical practices are loaded with referrals, we send people out and they send other people to us. We just cannot be all things at all times. It may totally be appropriate for your massage therapist to work alongside another professionals work though, just because they refer you out does not mean you necessarily have to stop going to your therapist.

New York State Massage law reads as follows: Massage therapists may provide services that lead to improved health and muscle function, but they do not diagnose medical diseases or disorders. They evaluate patients/clients in terms of health and disease in order to know what massage technique should be used and when to make referrals to other health care practitioners.

5. Maintaining your personal health records

Records are an essential part of making sure you get a good treatment. If you are seeing one person, they help them remember the details of the last treatment. If you are at a clinic that shares files, they help keep your heath care consistent and make sure your health information travels to the practitioner you are seeing next. Beyond that, your health care records may be needed if you have been in an accident, or are claiming to certain kinds of insurance. Beware of the therapist without files, they may not serve you best long term. New York State Massage Therapists have to maintain records for 6 years.

New York State Massage law reads as follows: therapists must keep a record of client evaluations and treatments for six years or until the client turns 22, whichever is longer.

If you want more information on New York State Massage Therapy, you can find it at the New York State Government website. If you want to verify that your massage therapist is in good standing you can do so here.

Body Mechanics NYC

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

 

 

Sports Massage Profile Gerry

Get to know our sports massage therapist Gerry!

We asked our sportsports massage therapist nyc gerrys massage therapist, Gerry, a few questions so you can get to know him a little better. Here is what he had to say!

What is your background in sports, since you are working in sports massage currently?

Gerry: I used to race and I was a bike messenger, back when that was a thing in New York.  I also spent some time snow boarding.

If you could try any sport what would it be?

Gerry: Motorcycle racing!

How did you get into sports massage as a thing?

Gerry: I have a curiosity about the way people move and want to help them.

Are there any athletes your particularly admire? 

Gerry: Peter Sagan, he is a professional road bicycle racer.

Is there anything that sets your massage apart from anyone else?

Gerry: I hope it is my sensitivity

Do you have any specialized training that you are really drawn to?

Gerry: While I love working with athletes, I also work with geriatric paitents and that work is really inspiring. 

Is there any special skills or hobbies you want us to know about, something people would be surprised to know?

Gerry: I am really good at backgammon and swing dancing.

Last but not least, if you could have a super power, what would it be?

Gerry: I would want to fly of course!

 

If you want more information on Gerry you can find it on our therapist profile page.

To book an appointment see our prices page.

Body Mechanics NYC

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

 

 

 

 

 

Sports Massage Therapy Profile -Laura F.

Get to Know One of Our Sports Massage Therapists, Laura!

We are asking our sports massage therapists for a little extra information so that you can get to know them and their experience in sports massage.

 

So here it goes!

First off Laura, What is your background in Sports?

Laura: I have been working in the field of sports massage for 30 years.  I am not just a massage therapist but I am also a personal trainer, and I train myself.  I have played a number of sports… including boxing, running, and lifting.  If you are coming in for these things, I have a pretty good understanding of what is going on. 

What is your best “uh oh” story in regard to injury?

Laura: When I moved from LA to NYC, I (bleeping) fell on some black ice and I tore my left medial meniscus.  That was awful and it was a long recovery. 

If you could try any sport now, without limitations, what sport would it be? 

Laura: Krav Maga!

How did you get into sports massage?

Laura: When I was at Swedish Institute in NYC, I was bored with the relaxation massage and energy work I was learning.   I had an an instructor who taught sports massage and she was incredible.  That’s when I knew that was what I wanted to do. 

What are your favorite kinds of ‘sport’ people to work on now?

Laura: I love to work with dancers, but I also just love people who are active and want to take care of their bodies. 

Are there any athletes that you particularly admire?

Laura: Manny Pacquiao and Michael Jordan.  They are my favorites!

What sets your sports massage apart from everyone else’s sports massage?

Laura: (laughs) Honestly, I do not compare myself.  I just studied hard and took advanced courses.   I truly care about helping people in pain, and teaching them how to learn about their bodies.  As a trainer, I can also suggest some ways they might prevent hurting themselves. 

And last but not least, are there any other things we should know about you?

Laura: I am also a certified life coach.

To book with Laura, you can book online at this location, or you can read more about her Massage therapy and Sports massage there.

 

Body Mechanics NYC, 1 W 34th St, #204, , New York, NY 10001, United States (US) - Phone: 212-600-4808 Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com URL: http://www.bodymechanicsnyc.com/

 

 

Raising Awareness for Prenatal and Postnatal Care in NYC

 

Miles for Midwives helps raise awareness for prenatal and postnatal care in New York. 

Raising awareness for prenatal and postnatal care in NYC

Every year we are fortunate enough to participate in some great events through some of our amazing friends. This year we ran the Miles for Midwives 2018 5k run in Prospect Park, a fantastic event that is also child friendly. Miles for Midwives is a professional organization that supports midwifery and midwives in New York. Their mission is to help raise awareness to important issues surrounding birth, prenatal and postnatal care. Last year Miles for Midwives raised $35,000 for their organization through their fundraising.

What is a midwife you ask? Midwives are independent practitioners that provide healthcare — maternity, gynecologic, reproductive, contraceptive and primary healthcare — to women from adolescence through post menopause, and to infants up to 28 days of age”.  Midwives can help you make healthy choices for birth and after-care, working with your health care team. 

Why focus on women’s health and Prenatal/Postnatal Care?

The United States has the unfortunate position of being one of the worst countries for infant and mother mortality, especially for minorities, despite the United States being one of the wealthiest countries in the world. If you would like more information on that subject, check out this NPR article that is fully linked to research. 

Female complaints, such as chronic fatigue often often go untreated due to not being taken seriously, and women are often subject to longer wait times than men, therefore medical professions that focus on women’s health are incredibly important. That is not to say women are not getting great care because there are a number of resources women can use throughout their lives to improve their chances of getting what they need when they need it. Midwives are just one of the resources. It is, however, important to always remember that a mother may not be getting great care, and that keeping alert for signs of both mental and physical distress are essential as part of a health care team. 

Our care-team often work with pregnant women and women in their fourth trimester (what is the fourth trimester?)  One of the most important jobs a massage therapist can fill is to spot potential problems and refer people to the right kind of health care. Consequently, we thought we would take some time to provide a little reader information on some of the potential problems and health care concerns that our care-team often intercepts. 

Pre-baby we often focus on pain and stress management in our office but during intake we ask for a full health history. Headaches, swollen limbs, faintness, over-fatigue, and numbness and tingling can all be signs that you need a referral out, and your massage therapist should be happy to give you one. Over the course of my career I have referred a number of patients out for similar reasons, only to learn later that we were able to intervene early in an issue, which avoided a more serious problem later.

Beret Kirkeby Massage TherapistI am currently pregnant, so I understand how confusing some of the symptoms can be! Many of the warning signs are also symptoms of pregnancy!

Additionally, given pregnant woman sometimes have changed their lifestyle, it is extremely important that mothers know there are resource available to them. Letting a mum to be know there is help available to them can be invaluable; they just need to know to look in the right place.

As massage therapists, when we sit down with someone and spend an hour with them facilitating a restful state, we have the luxury of time that medical professionals often don’t have so we can often direct women to resources that they need, such as lactation consultants, doulas, midwifes, and pelvic PT’s. Additionally, we can help a woman understand that it is okay to take an hour a day to seek help with us or another practitioner to help with their stress management.

After the baby is born, it is especially important to continue with self-care. Many women simply do not know help is available for them, mostly because women do not talk about the problems they are having. In fact, after birth 1 in 10 mothers continue to experience pelvic pain after the 3 month mark and after their first vaginal birth, 21% of women may experience incontinence.

Massage therapists who do a quality intake and know the statistics can help steer women to great referrals when they come in for unresolved pain issues or complications. 

What can you do to help? 

Continue the conversation on women’s health and participate in great events like the Midwives for Miles next year!

 

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage, Prenatal and Postnatal Care

1 W. 34th St, #204

NY, NY, 10001

646-709-2280

 

 

 

 

 

We Have Moved to a New Location!

We Have a Fantastic New Location

Hello all! We just wanted to keep you updated to a few of the changes that have happened this year. The biggest of which of course is WE HAVE MOVED TO A NEW LOCATION!! It was a long time coming but after 5 years at our former location, near Grand Central Station, we have moved to a stunning location just near the Empire States Building! We traded one monument for another! Our new location address is 1 w. 34th Street. NY, NY, 10017. We are right across the street from the Empire States Building and across from Heartland Brewery. Our phone number and web contact information remains the same. We stay devoted to the same kinds of treatment: Sports Massage, Medical Massage, TMJ Massage, Breast Cancer Massage and Runners Massage.

There are a few things you should know about our new location 

  • Space! We have a lot of it! We went from 3 rooms to 4 room…and we have a staff room now with an extra large lobby. No more crowds and being on top of one another.

 

  • We have central air that is HEPA filtered. So this is pretty awesome…especially since our old space ran really hot and the dirty old outside air used to come in…but it also means there is 1 temp for everyone. If you are running hot or cold please let us know, there are fans and table heaters in each room but we can’t control the room temperature any more.

 

  • It is MUCH nicer. I mean really, its is totally an upgrade. We look a little more medical, as we are in a medical building, but we have kept with the same lux and plush stylings. We are just a little more streamlined now. The old space was cute, but the building was old and ill cared for. This building is brand spanking new!

 

  • Speaking of new, we have a few new things that may surprise you. Now on weekends we have to buzz you in. It takes a few seconds, but hey we have a buzzer, because we are fancy now.

 

  • We also have changed our pricing. You can find that information here: Pricing at Body Mechanics . Minimum wage is changing in NYC and we needed to adapt to reflect that. On the upside, yay for sustainable living! You will also find little perks like a new hot and cold water cooler, a better bathroom (no more keys), wifi for you, and a new charging station.  We also have some new therapists. You can check them out here: Massage Therapists 

Here are some pictures of our new space to help you get an idea of what we are doing. Scroll through and take a look!!
Our Space
 

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 w. 34th Street #204. NY, NY 10017

212-600-4808

info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Finding Naturalism in Massage

naturalism and massage

Many of us in the massage industry spend a lot of time talking to other therapists about massage therapy. What is holding it back? Is it the non-science based nature that is the issue? Is it the lack of research? Is it the people it attracts? Is it the professionalism? What about the spiritual aspects that some seem to want to connect to?

As most of you know, I am firmly in the science-based camp. My background is  pain management with rehabilitative exercise. This is what I was taught in school and I was exposed to nothing else. Prior to my RMT training, I had taken pre-med courses in college, and before that all the AP science classes offered in high school so the Canadian program fit right in with my science-based ideals. It made sense to me.

The US massage industry frustrates me to no-end. I desperately want it to change because, after working in Canada as part of a heath care continuum, I know how good a massage program can be.

I know there are a lot of us pushing for a shift to a science-based program. However, given the condition of the US system and its irregularity, changing to science-based might be asking too much transitionally.

The US massage industry faces a number of problems. With such a large number of workers currently in the industry, the change would surely need to be gradual. One of the things I constantly think about is, with the current requirement of 500-1000 hours and no competency requirement, are we barking up the wrong tree demanding science? Is science even doable? Of course I learned some science in my education, but I didn’t necessarily learn the act of science in massage school. Often times what we receive is the outline of science, the puppetry of science, the mimicry of science…not actual science, even from the best and brightest who teach and share knowledge.  I am not saying don’t teach the science aspects, I am saying expecting meta data analysis from someone still trying to figure out where the elbow is, is probably unrealistic.  The results may be as poor and dangerous as pseudoscience.  Maybe what we should be asking for is naturalism…and leave the science to the experts.

Naturalism is defined as: A philosophical viewpoint according to which everything arises from natural properties and causes, and supernatural or spiritual explanations are excluded or discounted. 

Massage therapy lends itself  very well to naturalism. At its base even the most complex thing that I have done with a patient through a rehabilitation is simply mimicking how the body would normally behave in a controlled, suggestive state in the hopes that the body realizes it can keep moving and that it does not need whatever protection or feeling it has produced.  I try to remind the body of its normal function by setting the stage with relaxing/safe elements, and then lead it through passive, active and resisted activities.   And follow up by assigning exercises that will re-enforce that. There are only so many things the body can do. We take the body through these activities in order to start a dialogue. A dialogue with words like – rest, slack, stretch,  move, stimulate, sense, resist and strengthen.  I try to build windows of time where there is an altered signal or decreased signal, so the body can get back to doing what it loves to do…homeostasis. I monitor all of it through range of motion and pain scales. It is not rocket science;) Of course it can get more complex when you start building in limitations and conditions, but at its base its fairly simple.

Science can be a complicated system of testable questions and answers. There are entire systems in place to understand how to correctly ask the questions, let alone address  the answers. Rarely is it simple. It takes years to study, explore and even begin to understand even small parts of it. Naturalism however is beautiful in it’s simplicity. With 500-1000 hours of training and little time to test the application let alone question it, perhaps some of the answers lie there.

Starting with a few simple observations, perhaps we could make a safer, simpler, more ethical massage world. Here are some of the simple statements I keep in mind when practice daily.

  • Relaxation has value and potential.
  • The body is fine the way it is. Homeostasis works. For the most part the body will correct itself naturally, unless disease is present.
  • In the end, all change comes from internal function, not external force *other than trauma
  • Setting the stage for rest and digest may help remind the body that things are ok, which may let the person move more or differently, so they can get back to their normal.
  • Form is not necessarily representative of function.

What are the statement you practice under? More and more I see statements like “the science of massage”. Yet that statement is pretty misleading, when I think about what I do, as I am not really doing anything. I am simply setting the stage for what the body does for itself…naturally. Absolutely there is room for more advanced practitioners in advanced practice settings,  but at the core we need to get comfortable with who we are.

*I want to make a small disclosure here, as to the above statements of rehab. Rehab or rehabilitative exercise falls within the scope of an RMT (Canada). In no way do I advertise the practice of that here in NY, the example is based on my past experiences where it would be very normal for me to work with stroke patients, whiplash patients, etc combining manual therapy, movement and rehab exercise on my own. Your scope will depend on where you practice, and you should follow the local law to that effect.

 

Does your Massage Consent Pass the Peanut Butter and Jelly Test?

Consent, Massage &Peanut Butter & Jelly

*Full disclosure, I believe I learned this exercise in grade school creative writing.

Frequently when talking to clients you may think that you are communicating effectively and giving a great consent when you actually are not. This failing actually massage consenthappens with everyone at some time. People are full of funny little quirks. If you ask them if they understand, they may say yes when they mean no, or you yourself may unintentionally overcomplicate the matter in order to show you understand when you don’t understand. To make things even murkier, lurking below our psychology, the actual words we choose may have a totally different meaning to another person based on the context, their past experience, and the desired outcome.So how do you know if you’re really making sense and connecting on any legitimate level?

I would always advocate for clarity and simplicity of speech, but sometimes even when you think you are being clear you are not.

This recently happened between a staff member and a client. As the mediator, I listened to both sides of the event, and both thought they had clearly communicated their thoughts but both walked away completely at odds with the outcome. So what happened?


 

-The client had expressed that her shoulders were tight and her neck needed work

-After a full intake, the therapist confirmed that she agreed and that she also wanted to work on those areas and described “We have 30 minutes. I would like to spend about 15 min on each area. How does that sound?”

-At the end of the massage the client was unhappy and stated, “Although I thought the massage was quite good, I asked for my neck to be done”

-In talking to the therapist, I learned she had performed a 30 minute massage, with 15 minutes on the shoulders and 15 minutes on the neck, but she had performed the majority of the cervical massage prone, rather than supine because she felt the client was very relaxed and did not wish to ruin that therapeutically. As the client was use to the neck treatment having been performed face up, she assumed it had not been done and left unhappy. 


 

Even though both parties sat down to communicate formally, because of the personal histories they brought to the table, they failed to reach clarity. For reasons like this, and many others, I really recommend putting your consent through the peanut butter and jelly test. It goes like this:

Write instructions for making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich to an alien, who does not know anything about this planet. 

While the task seems simple enough, you will soon find you are going to run into problems when you start critically thinking about things such as:

 

  • What is jelly?
  • What is a plate? What does that look like?
  • What is a knife?
  • How do you determine amounts?
  • What are descriptive terms? What do they mean?

Through this practice, you begin to understand there is a LOT we take for granted in our communication, even when relating to other professionals. Words like ‘massage, trigger point, therapeutic, deep, strong, sports, etc’ may have lots of meaning, some meaning, no meaning, or a different meaning, depending on who you are talking to. So if you think you are communicating clearly or if you suspect that you’re not, try running through the peanut butter and jelly test and see what you are taking for granted.

 

 

What I did not learn about fascia work and massage

UNLEARNING

This blog was inspired by the fact that we spend a lot of time trending hard and obsessing over modalities. We debate whether they are ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ and what we as therapists should be doing now.

Recently I talked with a very aggressive young therapist who was willing to alienate many of his current peers and deprive himself from the benefit of their experiences by defending a modality he in fact had no training in, simply because some of his previous peers had deemed it ‘right’. And shortly before that, while training another young man, I told him he might want to do some more research on some of the modalities he was using simply to ensure that they actually did what they said they did. At that point, he became completely confused, afraid to treat, thinking he might be doing something wrong.

It leaves me wondering if, as experienced therapists in the age of easy communication, we are really doing our parts by telling younger therapists what to value and what not to, without letting them see how we got there – because the process is just as important as the result.

With that I give you  ‘What I did not learn about Fascia work 2005’


I did not learn about Rolfing or Tom Myers

I did not learn that it was tearing, stretching or re-modeling

I did not learn to use heavy pressure

I did not learn to go in any one direction or follow a track

I did not learn it as a passive activity

I was not told that it would solve any one problem or kind of pain

I did not learn that it would hurt

 

In fact, what I learned did not have much theory behind it. What we had learned about fascia was imparted to us in anatomy and dissection, where it was labeled ‘the packaging’.

Our instructions and week of practice were demos of our teacher accessing different areas of the body, with different holds, based on the shape of the body, the clients’ complaints, and instructions that our work did not have to look like hers. We were just to find a comfortable way to hold, to move in the direction of ease with the biology, to move slowly and gently, and to ask for feed back.

When the demos were over, we were set free to work on our own. Our instructor went around and helped us with body mechanics for staying in one place for a long time, and showed us how to keep our fingers from digging in and pinching skin.

Some of the work was feather light, as it was around the face. Some of the work was broader, as it was on the leg or arm. None of the work was particularly deep. The methodology she gave us was “see what works for your client, given their comfort, and the shape of the structure or how you can access it.” It was simply another way to ‘get in’ based on the needs of the client.

At the end of the class, when we had worked every part, she added to the list, “Next time you practice, experiment with having the person tense a little under your hand, and then relax. And see what that does….see if that changes things.”

I think that was probably the most important part of the class.

I have been working this way since 2005. I also imagine everyone who was in my graduating class is working that way, and that our instructor learned to work that way from someone before her, and that she had a community of peers that supported her in that work.

It is fantastic that we now know the tensile strength of fascia, but modalities have never been what drives good treatment, they are ONLY an extension of a communication process. I do not know that we are doing young therapists any favors by debating what is right and wrong as far as modalities. In fact it gives the impression that things are black and white, which they are not. There is ONLY what works given the circumstance, and it requires a lot of thinking outside the box often. Young therapists need to be taught to think for themselves about what is plausible, and to listen. I am not so sure that is the impression we are leaving.