General Archives - Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage : Sports Massage and Massage Therapy New York City

How to Make a Flax Seed Heat Pack

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How to Make a Flax Seed Heat Pack

Want to make your own flax seed heat packs?

I wanted to make a little something to use in our massage therapy clinic, particularly for warming cervical areas as a wrap. These flax seed heat packs are perfect for massage. They can also be used as cold packs, or used as a cervical hot/cold bolster. I have found the flax seed packs to be far more adaptable than the cervical thermophores that are electric or  hydrocollaters that are kept in water.

I particularly like these flax seed packs better than the other options I have used because I feel their shape is far more adaptable and there is something soothing about the weight to them. I’s kind of like a pleasant warm bean bag, and even without heat it is a nice ‘sensory’ weight. I use them frequently myself when I have tension headaches by laying on the floor and using it as a warm cervical bolster. Like in this pic—>

I have a significant background in sewing, so this flax seed heat pack is an easy project for me…if you have never sewed before, it might be ‘easy/moderate’. It is mostly straight lines and the only really challenging bit is the last step, where you have to keep the seeds in and sew at the same time. (more on that later)

What you will need for this DYI flax seed hot pack project:

  • Flax seed (I bought a 10 lb bag from Amazon and it made about 10 packs)
  • Sewing machine
  • Cotton or poly-cotton fabric (I used this quilting fabric from Amazon and it made about 5 packs)
  • Shears
  • Needle and thread (of matching or complementary color)
  • Wax pen
  • Measuring tool

The first step is to iron your fabric out so when you cut it it is nice and smooth. After that you will cut it into the desired lengths. If you do not have proper shears, make sure you at least have some very sharp scissors.  I wanted my flax seed packs to be about 4 inches by 16inches as I wanted to use them for the cervical spine.

If you want to have a little fun with the project, you can make your hot packs any shape, hearts, squares, triangles, you name it. To do this you need to leave a little at each end for the seams, as well as one seam that can actually be the fold if you’re lazy 🙂  I cut my fabric into 10″x 16″ segments, and then folded it in half, with the BAD SIDE out and iron it again.

Once you have re-ironed, make sure the all the edges line up as square. Make any adjustments you need as far as making the item symmetrical if you goofed. Now you are going to get ready to sew. I want to make sure my machine is set to a small stitch, so that it can contain the flax and use a heavier weight thread if my machine will take it. That makes sure you do not have an exploding flax seed hot pack down the line:)

Once I am ready to sew. I start with a back stitch at the open end of the short side to make sure the seam will not unravel in time (you can do this by sewing forward, then back and then forward again) Then I sew down one of the short sides to the fold, leaving about 1/4 inch of  the fabric’s edge. When I reach the corner, I do a little back stitch again for integrity, then make a turn by lifting the presser foot and moving the fabric with the needle down. Now sew along the FOLDED edge, leaving 1/4 inch of a edge or less.  When I reach the corner, again I back stitch and use the same method for the turn, then sew back up the last short side.

This should leave you with what looks like an ugly fabric envelope. Let’s make it less ugly by turning it inside out, so now the good side of the fabric faces out. Guess what? Time to iron again! Iron everything flat, so the corners are square (you may need a tool to poke them out) Now you should have a pretty envelope that is open on one side, but not on the folded side. (I sew that side even though its folded for extra strength and so that the look matches all the way around, but you do not have to.)

Now it is time to get out your wax pencil and mark off where you are sewing next. This step is totally optional. You can certainly just make a big floppy bag, but I like mine to have the flax seeds divided up so it is weighted evenly and so I can fold it into a cervical pillow. I measure and draw lines to divide my envelope into 4 even chunks of 4 inches (ish).

Mark your envelope so it is square and even. I use a straight edge piece of paper to do it or a ruler. Once you have marked, you are going to sew (using a back stitch at the start) from the already sewed side, to the open side. Stop about 1/2 of an inch from the open end (you will need this to fold your fabric over)

You might notice now you have some marking on your fabric that you do not want. There are a few options, you can wash your fabric, or you can iron over it with a paper buffer to pull up the wax.

 

Yay! We are so close to being done. We just need to fill the bags with flax seeds and sew one final edge. I fill each pocket about 1/2 to 2/3 full, the important thing is that they are all filled to the same height. You may need a measuring cup and a funnel to do this properly.  (if you are a scent person now would be the time you could put in some lavender buds or cloves. I do not because we have a medical massage location where we use limited scents)

Once the flax seed is in the bags, then you need to fold over the open edge so that BOTH edges are on the inside and pin it closed. If you are new to sewing I recommend pinning it closed and basting by hand a line of thread right next to the flax, that will keep the flax in place while you sew and keep a clean area between the pins and flax…otherwise it can get messy.(this is pretty easy and just involves hand sewing a thread line, when you are done with the project you cut the knotted end of the thread and pull it out completely.)

Once you are set up to sew the last edge…DO IT! You just want to make sure you are back stitching to start and end, and that you are catching the folded over pieces in the seam. Because there is flax in there, one side of the fabric is going to be very heavy, so I help my machine a little by lifting it up and keeping the tension off the needle.

When you are finished, trim up any dangling threads…and that is it! You are ready to use. They make excellent gifts or therapy tools. To heat them you will want to put them in the microwave for 30-45 seconds. Test that, many microwaves are different. We also put them in dry hot cabbi’s.  Full disclosure, if you are making them for therapy use you are going to want to make a cover, or many covers, like we did…but that is another project:)

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Five Things Your New York State Massage Therapist Should be Doing for You

We have put together the top 5 things your New York State Massage Therapist, should be doing for you but may not be….

This blog post is specific to New York State Massage Therapy, but in any state that see’s massage therapy as a licensed medical profession, these may apply. We put together this list of important bullet points in order to educate the public about their rights. Massage therapist undergo training in order to become professionals, but the public is often unaware of what that training is or what their rights are. So here it goes, here are our top five things your New York State licensed Massage Therapist should be doing for you.

1. Giving you a full consent before you are treated or assessed

What is consent you ask? It is your agreement to the treatment, assessment, or procedure that is about to be performed. It can be both verbal and written. Consent can cover the type of treatment for massage (for example: trigger point therapy, stretching, or Swedish massage), how it is performed, what products or tools may be used (for example lotions or graston tools), and even as far as what smells you might encounter. The bottom line is, you have full control over what happens to you, even if you have not been made aware of it. What does this mean for you in real time? At the very least you should be looking for a Massage Therapist who gives you a rundown of what they are going to do before they do it, a little snapshot so to speak. This rundown, not only keeps you safe but also ends up in making you happier over all with your massage because you can actually relax.

2. Protecting your right to privacy

In New York state, Massage Therapists are considered Medical Professionals. They are required by law to protect your privacy. If you find your therapist is particularly chatty about their other patients, it may be time to move on.

The New York State Massage law reads as follows:Massage therapists will safeguard the confidentiality of all patient/client information, including patient/client records, unless disclosure is required by law or court order. Any situation which requires the revelation of confidential information should be clearly delineated in records of massage therapists.

3. You have the full right to refuse, modify, or change the treatment at any time. 

Ever have the feeling you have made a terrible mistake, part way through something? It happens, even with massage. It is totally ok to stop once you start. Individual clinics may have policy’s on if you will pay or not based on stopping treatment so you may want to check, but generally if you encounter a medical problem, such as feeling dizzy, we waive all fees at our clinic. Fee aside, you can always simply stop regardless of the situation. If you just think that it is not working out, you can always change the plan too. If your therapists pressure is not right, tell them…or redirect the treatment entirely so it works on what you just figured out you want. A 30 minute back massage can easily become a 25 minute foot massage. Do it, it is your right.

New York State Massage law reads as follows: Massage therapists will respect the patient’s/client’s right to refuse, modify or terminate treatment, regardless of prior consent for such treatment.

4. Referring you out

Is your therapist Mr/Ms fix it? It is fantastic that you found a great therapist. Massage Therapists cannot wear all health care hats however. As a Massage Therapist we cannot diagnose or treat disease, so if you genuinely have a medical issue no one has seen you for, your therapist should refer you out. Vibrant clinical practices are loaded with referrals, we send people out and they send other people to us. We just cannot be all things at all times. It may totally be appropriate for your massage therapist to work alongside another professionals work though, just because they refer you out does not mean you necessarily have to stop going to your therapist.

New York State Massage law reads as follows: Massage therapists may provide services that lead to improved health and muscle function, but they do not diagnose medical diseases or disorders. They evaluate patients/clients in terms of health and disease in order to know what massage technique should be used and when to make referrals to other health care practitioners.

5. Maintaining your personal health records

Records are an essential part of making sure you get a good treatment. If you are seeing one person, they help them remember the details of the last treatment. If you are at a clinic that shares files, they help keep your heath care consistent and make sure your health information travels to the practitioner you are seeing next. Beyond that, your health care records may be needed if you have been in an accident, or are claiming to certain kinds of insurance. Beware of the therapist without files, they may not serve you best long term. New York State Massage Therapists have to maintain records for 6 years.

New York State Massage law reads as follows: therapists must keep a record of client evaluations and treatments for six years or until the client turns 22, whichever is longer.

If you want more information on New York State Massage Therapy, you can find it at the New York State Government website. If you want to verify that your massage therapist is in good standing you can do so here.

Body Mechanics NYC

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

 

 

Review of Walt Fritz Myofascial Release Seminar

Walt Fritz’s Myofascial Release Seminar for Neck/Voice/Swallowing disorders

Before I get into the meat of this, there are a few things to note.  This class, ‘Myofascial Release Seminar for neck/voice/swallowing disorders,‘ is named for the conditions that may occur in the area being treated, as well as how the touching is done. While the title is ‘neck/voice/swallowing’  you can use many of the cervical techniques with any patient who has neck discomfort.  To further the point about the course name, it also is named for Myofascial release.  However Walt is not suggesting that this modality is meant to replace whatever intervention you are already using or that you should just go pulling on skin.  We frequently have a description problem when it comes to manual therapy and courses that operate within the realm of scientific reality.  The question becomes, what do you call things when your tag is “this may help some people, some times, in some way, with some things…but it also may not”.  So if you are fine with the spirit of this, keep reading.

Two other staff members (Tommy and Sylvia) and I attended this course in April of 2019.  It is a two day seminar.  This particular one was at the Grabscheid Voice and Swallowing Center of Mount Sinai near Union Square.  The attendees were mostly speech pathologists, with a smattering of other professions, including massage therapy.  I will get back to who is in the course, but one of the reasons I have admired Walt’s classes is that he has taken the time to get his classes approved for New York State Massage Therapy continuing education credits.  In New York State, it is super hard to level up your skill set when the same information is being taught and re-taught by the same professionals, over and over again.

Walt’s class was well attended and well organized.  He utilizes helpers to make sure you get real feedback ,even though you are in a large group.  Snacks and coffee were provided, although we did not need the coffee to keep us awake.

If research is your thing, Walt does provide it with his materials, but

you are not going to go into a deep dive in this class.  He will give you an introduction and you are welcome to proof on your own.  The assumption is that you are a professional and as such, it is your job to review this information.  A small amount of time was spent on this.  In this way the class was pretty neutral in the “how we think this works” department.  It is not likely to radically change anyone’s mind on the function of manual therapy.  That being said, I am not really sure anyone’s mind can be changed unless they want to.  That is another topic entirely.

The same goes for anatomy in this course.  Walt provided some information in the form of his manual, but the goal is not to teach you anatomy.  If you are a little rough on what goes where in the head, face, neck and jaw, I would recommend flipping through your anatomy book before attending.  You will get a lot more out of the course by being able to connect the dots.  Keep in mind that he is not trying to reinvent the wheel, just showing you different ways you can roll it.  If you are struggling to find a touch that feels safe and appropriate due to anatomy, you might be slowed down.

This class follows the fairly typical pattern of  the presenter talking about what you are going to demo, then performing a demonstration on a willing subject, before you split off and practice on each other.

There are three things Walt does that I like:

  1. He utilizes technology to solve the issue of everyone standing around him, blocking the view of those behind them, while he demos.  One of his helpers was present at all times to get a live feed video on the manual actives that he is showing.  That video was then projected onto three screens so that everyone in the conference hall could access it as if they were in the front row.  The space we were in was well set up for that, and other spaces may not be, but I can only assume if he took the time to do it thoughtfully this time, he probably does in most spaces if there is need. (Maybe he will chime in on an answer for us post, post 🙂
  2. Walt gives his interview process with a patient equal weight to the hands on that he is doing.  In most classes, manual or otherwise, teachers often jump to new technique.  The format becomes ‘for this problem use this thing”.  Not so here.  Walt lets you sit in on his client/patient interview.  If you are a massage therapist, who wants to improve quality, booking, professionalism etc, this is 100% the area that you need to work on.  Sitting in on this is gold.  What he is showing is a conversational health care format of “ol’ dr fricara” interview (if you do not know what that is here is a link) and an adapted motivational interview strategy that continues on to the treatment in the form of feedback (remember consent is an ongoing process).
  3. He has a mixed profession class. For many of the speech path professionals manual therapy was new. They got to work with massage therapists. I think they learned a lot from them. For the massage therapists we got to work with speech pathologists….same story. Both sets came away with great referrals and a really good understanding of how we might work together to better care for people. Rather than pair off into our professions, we sought out the other for their expertise. It was a unique opportunity.

As to the things I did not like. To be honest I would have to be super nit-picky about this. It is a great class. I would say if you are really comfortable working cervical spine in multiple ways manually, or intra-oral treatment is in your wheel house already, it might be a little slow for you. Both Sylvia and I spend a fair amount of our days in working with TMD, so much of this was review. Even so, we managed to come away with some good take aways. Even if this is the case, there is HUGE value in watching how someone else problem solves the same problems. This course assisted us in the decision to add ‘dycem’ as a home care tool for our population, as they often struggle to figure out how to self treat at home in a way that feels good.

Walt also provides ongoing support in his facebook groups (invite only) and his YouTube channel for Myofascial Release.

So to wrap it up: If you are a speech pathologist, much of what he teaches will give you a fresh approach and more options, if you are a massage therapist, this is right up your alley, and will be a detailed course getting you comfortable with helping cervical/jaw/neck pain and problems.

Additionally, if you do find that you NEED more and this was basic, Walt also has an advanced MFR for Neck, Voice, Swallowing class you can check out.<—-I just found out about that from his mailing list.

Body Mechanics NYC

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Raising Awareness for Prenatal and Postnatal Care in NYC

 

Miles for Midwives helps raise awareness for prenatal and postnatal care in New York. 

Raising awareness for prenatal and postnatal care in NYC

Every year we are fortunate enough to participate in some great events through some of our amazing friends. This year we ran the Miles for Midwives 2018 5k run in Prospect Park, a fantastic event that is also child friendly. Miles for Midwives is a professional organization that supports midwifery and midwives in New York. Their mission is to help raise awareness to important issues surrounding birth, prenatal and postnatal care. Last year Miles for Midwives raised $35,000 for their organization through their fundraising.

What is a midwife you ask? Midwives are independent practitioners that provide healthcare — maternity, gynecologic, reproductive, contraceptive and primary healthcare — to women from adolescence through post menopause, and to infants up to 28 days of age”.  Midwives can help you make healthy choices for birth and after-care, working with your health care team. 

Why focus on women’s health and Prenatal/Postnatal Care?

The United States has the unfortunate position of being one of the worst countries for infant and mother mortality, especially for minorities, despite the United States being one of the wealthiest countries in the world. If you would like more information on that subject, check out this NPR article that is fully linked to research. 

Female complaints, such as chronic fatigue often often go untreated due to not being taken seriously, and women are often subject to longer wait times than men, therefore medical professions that focus on women’s health are incredibly important. That is not to say women are not getting great care because there are a number of resources women can use throughout their lives to improve their chances of getting what they need when they need it. Midwives are just one of the resources. It is, however, important to always remember that a mother may not be getting great care, and that keeping alert for signs of both mental and physical distress are essential as part of a health care team. 

Our care-team often work with pregnant women and women in their fourth trimester (what is the fourth trimester?)  One of the most important jobs a massage therapist can fill is to spot potential problems and refer people to the right kind of health care. Consequently, we thought we would take some time to provide a little reader information on some of the potential problems and health care concerns that our care-team often intercepts. 

Pre-baby we often focus on pain and stress management in our office but during intake we ask for a full health history. Headaches, swollen limbs, faintness, over-fatigue, and numbness and tingling can all be signs that you need a referral out, and your massage therapist should be happy to give you one. Over the course of my career I have referred a number of patients out for similar reasons, only to learn later that we were able to intervene early in an issue, which avoided a more serious problem later.

Beret Kirkeby Massage TherapistI am currently pregnant, so I understand how confusing some of the symptoms can be! Many of the warning signs are also symptoms of pregnancy!

Additionally, given pregnant woman sometimes have changed their lifestyle, it is extremely important that mothers know there are resource available to them. Letting a mum to be know there is help available to them can be invaluable; they just need to know to look in the right place.

As massage therapists, when we sit down with someone and spend an hour with them facilitating a restful state, we have the luxury of time that medical professionals often don’t have so we can often direct women to resources that they need, such as lactation consultants, doulas, midwifes, and pelvic PT’s. Additionally, we can help a woman understand that it is okay to take an hour a day to seek help with us or another practitioner to help with their stress management.

After the baby is born, it is especially important to continue with self-care. Many women simply do not know help is available for them, mostly because women do not talk about the problems they are having. In fact, after birth 1 in 10 mothers continue to experience pelvic pain after the 3 month mark and after their first vaginal birth, 21% of women may experience incontinence.

Massage therapists who do a quality intake and know the statistics can help steer women to great referrals when they come in for unresolved pain issues or complications. 

What can you do to help? 

Continue the conversation on women’s health and participate in great events like the Midwives for Miles next year!

 

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage, Prenatal and Postnatal Care

1 W. 34th St, #204

NY, NY, 10001

646-709-2280

 

 

 

 

 

We Have Moved to a New Location!

We Have a Fantastic New Location

Hello all! We just wanted to keep you updated to a few of the changes that have happened this year. The biggest of which of course is WE HAVE MOVED TO A NEW LOCATION!! It was a long time coming but after 5 years at our former location, near Grand Central Station, we have moved to a stunning location just near the Empire States Building! We traded one monument for another! Our new location address is 1 w. 34th Street. NY, NY, 10017. We are right across the street from the Empire States Building and across from Heartland Brewery. Our phone number and web contact information remains the same. We stay devoted to the same kinds of treatment: Sports Massage, Medical Massage, TMJ Massage, Breast Cancer Massage and Runners Massage.

There are a few things you should know about our new location 

  • Space! We have a lot of it! We went from 3 rooms to 4 room…and we have a staff room now with an extra large lobby. No more crowds and being on top of one another.

 

  • We have central air that is HEPA filtered. So this is pretty awesome…especially since our old space ran really hot and the dirty old outside air used to come in…but it also means there is 1 temp for everyone. If you are running hot or cold please let us know, there are fans and table heaters in each room but we can’t control the room temperature any more.

 

  • It is MUCH nicer. I mean really, its is totally an upgrade. We look a little more medical, as we are in a medical building, but we have kept with the same lux and plush stylings. We are just a little more streamlined now. The old space was cute, but the building was old and ill cared for. This building is brand spanking new!

 

  • Speaking of new, we have a few new things that may surprise you. Now on weekends we have to buzz you in. It takes a few seconds, but hey we have a buzzer, because we are fancy now.

 

  • We also have changed our pricing. You can find that information here: Pricing at Body Mechanics . Minimum wage is changing in NYC and we needed to adapt to reflect that. On the upside, yay for sustainable living! You will also find little perks like a new hot and cold water cooler, a better bathroom (no more keys), wifi for you, and a new charging station.  We also have some new therapists. You can check them out here: Massage Therapists 

Here are some pictures of our new space to help you get an idea of what we are doing. Scroll through and take a look!!
Our Space
 

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 w. 34th Street #204. NY, NY 10017

212-600-4808

info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Hands on Suggestions for Working with Trauma

Working with Trauma and Abuse

Before we go into what this post is, I want to touch quickly on what this post is NOT.hands on suggestions for working with abuse

It is not a substitute for an education course or training in working with victims of abuse/trauma. It is also not a suggestion to go beyond your scope or treat the abuse/trauma through massage therapy. You should follow your local law in reference to reporting abuse as a health care worker as it applies to you, and stay within your scope. I would also like to note that trauma takes many forms, it is not up to us to decide what is traumatic.

What this post is about is providing some useful suggestions to practicing therapists  for the physical part of the treatment when the subject comes up with existing patients or someone with a history of abuse/trauma who wants to be part of a massage program.  At some point in a career it is likely that either an existing client or a new client will  disclose to you during intake that they have been the victim of abuse/trauma. If you are unprepared for how to appropriately handle that disclosure, managing it could be challenging. I suggest you take some time to think about it, but here is what works for me. Keep in mind, I follow generally the Canadian standard of practice and use a full medical consent.

My first steps are to determine in a professional way -is it safe and appropriate to continue. While you do not want to make anyone’s situation worse, it is very important that both parties (patient and therapist) understand their roles to be able to continue. Within the consent process this is usually a pause for me. A time to acknowledge a statement, by saying “I am sorry to hear that. Are you getting help if you need it?”. If the answer is no, I can open a conversation about referral and talk about the role of massage, making sure the patient understands our respective roles and the limits of what I can do for them. If the answer is yes, then we can move forward to discussing why they are here today and stay focused on that. Either way, an open dialogue is the way to go.  Keep focused on your role, and be careful not to ask questions that are out of your scope.

You may also be asked some questions about what massage can and cannot do, or about your role. Do not be surprised if, as a lay person, a patient does not necessarily know the boundaries of your treatment and wants something you cannot provide. There are many misunderstandings out there as well as hocus pocus treatments. It is perfectly acceptable to say “I am sorry but that is beyond my training”  or  “You know, that’s totally out of my wheel house” if you are asked to comment, give advice on, or suggest something you’re not qualified to discuss. I tend to say “I just don’t know enough about that” a lot. Training levels are something easily understood by most people, and while it might be scary to say ‘I do not know’ at first, people readily accept it.

A good consent process is essential in all treatments. I usually expand my consent to include a few extra things for this topic to discuss treatment as a whole,  as providing a safe, comfortable, relaxing place that they can control, where all information is private is essential. This is really just a re-wording of my usual consent speech which is that you have the right to stop and modify, and control your treatment. I also expand the consent to have a discussion on triggers. This may not be an issue, but you need to address it before it is. It is important for a patient to know they can stop but what happens then? If for some reason your patient should experience distress in the treatment you should have already asked the appropriate questions about your behavior: Do you A. take your hands off right away? B. Stop moving but stay in place and let the patient try to relax? C.Exit the room so they have privacy? or  D. would they prefer that you check in with them without stopping? Everyone will have a different definition of what will make them feel safe so it is important to discuss this before it happens. If everyone is on board and you have had a frank discussion about how you’re going to proceed with the treatment and what the goals are, you can continue.

Many of the hands-on components that I will use will be the same ones I use every day, just packaged a little differently.

So here are my suggestions, some of them are obvious, and some might not be so obvious, but all of them I have used more than once for one reason or another in this scenario.

 prepared to work clothed

-Be prepared to work through sheets

-Be prepared with a heavy blanket or extra blankets; being covered by weight can feel comforting.

-Some people love heat. Be prepared to work hot if that works for them.

-Perfect your draping to an art form of tight origami

-Think about sleep shapes rather than how someone normally lies on the table- aka let them hold something if they feel like it or lay side-lying.

-Be prepared to try outside-of-the-box activities to give the patient control:

    1.Use body weight rather than press down onto the person- if you know some positional release techniques they may be appropriate. I find this particularly useful in the cervical region.

    2.Let them move under you rather than you move over them

    3.Consider rhythmic activities.

    4.Demonstrate the technique first, let the person try it on themselves and then you perform it with them- The verbiage on this  would be “So I am going to show you a technique, then I am going to let you try it, then we are going to do it together.”

-Let the person choose their own music/sound environment

-Work in non-traditional time lengths if necessary.

-Create patterns within the treatment: creating a pattern creates predictability. If someone is nervous this can go a long way to soothing them. Examples would be:

    1. Always anchoring the drape of the fabric in the same way before you move it to signal change.

    2. Opening and closing all sections of the body in the same way.

    3. Before moving a body part, giving a gentle squeeze (explain it of course by saying , ‘Just before I stretch you I will always let you know we are going to move by….”Creating a system of patterns can be helpful in creating a predictable environment.

-If home care is in your scope, working backwards from a home care first perspective might be helpful too. In this scenario, we would do home care together, and you would facilitate the process in office. As trust and comfort is gained you would add in more participation and possibly hands on. I use balls and body weight and do the exercises with them at first, then expand by adding hands on adjustments and then finally more hands on work.

 

These are just a few of the things that have worked for me in the past. It is important to remember that there is no one single way to treat and that clear communication is essential. I also want to take a moment as some of you might be asking ‘why would someone who has difficulty being touched seek out massage as a treatment and how did it get to this point?’. This is a little like asking ‘why did the chicken cross the road’. What it comes down to, is it does not matter how they got there, but it is your job to get them across the road safely.

 

Do you want run like a Spartan? Try a run at the Spartan Sprint.

 

The Spartan Sprint run took place at Citi Field on Saturday April 16th 2016.

citi field stadium. New York, New YorkSoooo my friends and I signed up for the Spartan Sprint run at Citi Field. What is a Spartan Sprint you ask? Well…it can be a lot of things but this one is a fantastic 3 mile + obstacle course race through Citi Field stadium.  I am a runner by trade and have been running for years, but I am also scrappy. I spent my early childhood scrabbling up trees so I was totally up for this challenge. And who does not want to break up the running season with something a little different!

A Spartan is an obstacle course race. This one happens to use Citi Field as its tromping ground. To be fair, I have no idea how many obstacles we actually did:), I will go more into that later, but the whole race takes you on a run all over the stadium, through the bleachers, up the stairs, through the parking lots, on the field and in the back tunnels. If you are a sports fan, it is kind of amazing. The views are fantastic and I can truly say, never have I ever seen more of a stadium.

One of the nice things about this race is the location, which is easily accessible by car or by train.  I took a train there and my racing buddy drove, neither one of us had any problems. We simply met up in the parking lot where we picked up our bibs and tags like any other race.Race entry packet, Spartan Sprint New York

This was easy and well organized. We had formed a team, so we were essentially running at the same time with a drawn go-time of 9:30 am. Being a team has it’s benefits and to be truthful this is one of the really nice things about the Spartan culture. While running is usually a solo project, the Spartan races allow you to form teams and do the race as a group which allows for your teammates to help you on challenges that might be just out-of-reach.  If you fail an obsticals, a teammate can help you or share in the penalty (30 burpee’s) to ease the burden.

This race had some great obstacle in it. A short list includes, rope climb, crawling under/over things, spear throwing, bucket carrying (with and without water), general lifting and hauling of things, a  plank skateboard thing, jumping rope and some other odds and ends. The set up is simple…run, then stop and perform a task (while the refs cheer you on). If you fail the task for some reason or cannot complete it due to physical reason then you can opt for 30 burpee’s. Sadly, we did not do a great job of documenting it because we were so busy running! But we managed to capture these shots from the obstacles.

IMG_5794 (1) Spartan Sprint run NY, NY

 

By the time we finished the race it was 10;30 or so…keep in mind we talked to other runners and wandered around snacking on the free goodies provided and comparing race stories. By that time there were a lot more families coming in to race too. They run a children’s Spartan race along side the adult one which is wonderful.

As an entry level, this sprint is a great time. It is challenging if you do all the obstacles and are in reasonable shape, but so long as you are fairly active I think any group that likes a challenge could participate in it. There were loads of people who walked the course rather than ran. The ability to share tasks makes the tasks achievable, but you can always opt out and take the burpee penalty. So as long as you know your skill level, you can keep yourself safe from injury. I say this with a grain of salt because any time you are doing complex activities while you are tired, you could easily hurt yourself…so be carful out there! And injury is relative. I would totally expect to come home with a few of these beauties! Since we were a little beat up we recovered by treating ourselves to Spa Castle for a sauna, which is just a short drive away.

IMG_5805 (1) FullSizeRender (16) (1)

But you will also get an amazing day, some great new skills and this….IMG_5809 (1)

Totally worth it. I really enjoyed the switch up from running, to some more skill oriented tasks. As a woman, I also have to say one of the nice things about races like this is it challenges you to build upper body strength in a really useful, practical way. I really do not know if I will ever have to bench a bunch of weights cold, but you never know; I totally might have to lift my body over a fence while running one day.

City Parks Foundation Run for the Parks – New York

New York has some great run programs in their Parks.New York run - city park run

This weekend Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage participated in the the City Parks Foundation Run for the Parks. It was a fantastic day for a run and the weather was perfect! While at times you might see massage therapists giving massages at these events, Body Mechanics rarely does it as those are unpaid events where therapists are asked to volunteer in exchange for exposure. Fortunately, we have moved past that model so you are more likely to see us participating. Most of our therapists are trainers or athletes themselves and we certainly do not want to miss out on the fun! The City Parks Foundation Run for the Parks was on April 10th 2016. It is a 4 mile course through New York City’s beautiful Central Park.

The City Parks Foundation Run for the Parks is a platform for City Parks Foundation and its efforts to provide free sports and fitness programs for kids. Support of City Parks Foundation helps provide vital cultural, educational, and athletic opportunities for New Yorkers of all ages, and strengthen community connections to local parks and green spaces. They work in over 350 parks citywide, presenting a broad range of programs in an effort to promote healthy communities. Their philosophy is simple: thriving parks reflect vibrant communities.

 

If you click through to the link you can see some of the pictures from the event that NYRR put together. NYRR puts on a great program for all ages. 3,491 Men and 3,420 women turned out for this inclusive event that also has a shorter run for the ‘wee’ folk. I would highly recommend it as training run for either group.  It was fantastic to see runners of all ages posing together with their well earned bibs.

I am a running coach but I do not get to compete as much as I would like. This event is extremely well-managed so it was a breeze. Picking up bibs was a snap thanks to the great organization of the event, and I simply met my running partner and her group of friends at the bag check. Since it is early in the season and New York decided to give us a cold and beautiful day, we had many layers. Many of us ended up with our bibs pinned to our legs as we knew mid-race we would start shedding cloths as the sun went up and our temperatures followed suit!

 

bib for New York city park run

As with all races, the only rough part is the corral wait! Hurry up and wait is always the way! Though we arrived at 7:50 or so, the corrals were well organized, although we did have a bit of a walk given that we had planned a slow training run just to get some time on legs in preparation for later runs;)FullSizeRender (14) (1)

All in all, this run was a perfect shake out. I think a lot of people ran to the event then ran home, but if your a new runner 4 miles is SOLID.

But best of all, my run friends introduced me to an amazing program called #22kill. So here is how it went down. We ran 4 miles and then at the finish line a big group of us dropped and did 22 push ups for veterans suicide awareness. AND IT WAS AWSOME.

What is #22kill?

#22kill is a global movement bridging the gap between veterans and civilians to build a community of support. 22KILL works to raise awareness of the suicide epidemic that is plaguing our country, and educate the public on mental health issues such as PTS.

We did 22 push ups as a group to honor those who serve and raise awareness, with a goal of getting to 22 million pushups. There were 6 of us so we contributed 132 push ups to the goal. If you want to get involved, you can go to their 22Kill page and see where to post your own vid or donate. It was a great way to finish off a race day.

 

The next NYRR run is the More/Shape women’s half marathon on April 17th! Have fun running!

 

 

Helpful links on Pain and the Body

You’re with your body all day, so it’s pretty important to you.

Let’s look at some places you can get more information on Pain and the Body

I wanted to put together a list of places to look for good information on subjects pertaining to massage, movement, pain, and the body. This is by no means comprehensive, but it is a place to start. Navigating the health care world as your own advocate can be hard. I could have a ticker tape parade with the number of times I have written key search words or links on the back of a napkin.  Without a background in science, it can be hard to tell plausible from implausible.

Soooo… that being said, I’ve compiled, all in one place, some links to some subjects that we end up sending out most. We  think these links are pretty helpful.

Why am I in pain?

Most people coming to see us are in pain. Pain can be scary…but what happens when you have been cleared by your doctor as healthy, and you still have pain? Or chronic pain? Or you have no pain but are diagnosed with a problem?

Do we advocate for those people to get checked again? Absolutely. But we also want them to know that pain is normal. That their body’s number one job is to protect them, and they can do a lot to manage that pain by understanding the basics of it. For that, we usually send them home with this video on pain by Lorimer Moseley. Not only can it be understood by professionals and lay people, it’s also really entertaining.

If you really want to learn and possibly change how your body feels about pain, take a look at this course by the ‘Retrain Pain Foundation’.  Each module takes just 2 or 3 minutes and can really make a difference in your life.

If you enjoyed the last one, and want more detail, we also recommend this handy video on pain. This is put out by the Hunter Integrated Health Service which delivers evidence-based pain care in Australia.

Is it my body posture?What to do about pain

The next question that inevitably comes up is, “Where did the pain come from? Since I don’t have an injury, is it my posture?”.  For various reasons, there is a LOT of misinformation out there on posture.  Posture certainly can affect you. For instance, we have all felt the pain of sitting in one position too long, but for the most part, your posture is probably fine. You could spend your whole life trying to whittle yourself into the perfect posture or way of moving. To help you understand the posture bunk we really like Paul Ingram’s blog pain and posture. It is very user-friendly and a really great place to start a search on a number of physical problems. Take a peek through the topics and you will see he touches a little on everything. A lot of the information he provides is the kind that can keep you from throwing good money after bad. So it is WELL worth reading through some of his work.

 

Do I need to foam roll or self treat?

People ask a LOT about foam rolling. Sometimes it’s in this hushed voice, like a secret, “You know I don’t foam roll…should I be?”. Look, it feels great to massage yourself. It also feels great to do something for yourself. But do you NEED to foam roll? A better question is, do want to?  The easiest thing is to probably do a little reading on what foam rolling actually does and to answer that, we usually provide Tom Hardgroves great blog piece on “How foam rolling worksand let you decide for yourself. His work is decidedly more technical but if you have a keen interest, it’s not out of reach. He also has a phenomenal book on movement you might check out. Sadly, we rarely have it in the office because we keep sending it home with patients.

 

What else can I do?

Well, it turns out you can do a lot. While doctors, physical therapists and massage therapists might help you with some aspects of your health and recovery, there is a lot you can do on your own to manage. Two videos by Dr. Mike Evans cover some of the excellent general things you can do for your physical and mental health to manage pain. Both are short, watchable and entertaining.

The first video talks about the research behind being active with your body and the health benefits that has. It is a great video on the benefits of moderate physical activity.

The other video that pairs nicely covers the topic of stress and your health.  Together, both of these topics are very important for helping you manage pain and function long-term. Do we recommend you see a doctor? Absolutely! But there is a lot you can do on your own too, without falling down the rabbit hole of unattainable results.

 

As more people ask questions we will add to this list. Good luck!

 

 

 

 

Finding Naturalism in Massage

naturalism and massage

Many of us in the massage industry spend a lot of time talking to other therapists about massage therapy. What is holding it back? Is it the non-science based nature that is the issue? Is it the lack of research? Is it the people it attracts? Is it the professionalism? What about the spiritual aspects that some seem to want to connect to?

As most of you know, I am firmly in the science-based camp. My background is  pain management with rehabilitative exercise. This is what I was taught in school and I was exposed to nothing else. Prior to my RMT training, I had taken pre-med courses in college, and before that all the AP science classes offered in high school so the Canadian program fit right in with my science-based ideals. It made sense to me.

The US massage industry frustrates me to no-end. I desperately want it to change because, after working in Canada as part of a heath care continuum, I know how good a massage program can be.

I know there are a lot of us pushing for a shift to a science-based program. However, given the condition of the US system and its irregularity, changing to science-based might be asking too much transitionally.

The US massage industry faces a number of problems. With such a large number of workers currently in the industry, the change would surely need to be gradual. One of the things I constantly think about is, with the current requirement of 500-1000 hours and no competency requirement, are we barking up the wrong tree demanding science? Is science even doable? Of course I learned some science in my education, but I didn’t necessarily learn the act of science in massage school. Often times what we receive is the outline of science, the puppetry of science, the mimicry of science…not actual science, even from the best and brightest who teach and share knowledge.  I am not saying don’t teach the science aspects, I am saying expecting meta data analysis from someone still trying to figure out where the elbow is, is probably unrealistic.  The results may be as poor and dangerous as pseudoscience.  Maybe what we should be asking for is naturalism…and leave the science to the experts.

Naturalism is defined as: A philosophical viewpoint according to which everything arises from natural properties and causes, and supernatural or spiritual explanations are excluded or discounted. 

Massage therapy lends itself  very well to naturalism. At its base even the most complex thing that I have done with a patient through a rehabilitation is simply mimicking how the body would normally behave in a controlled, suggestive state in the hopes that the body realizes it can keep moving and that it does not need whatever protection or feeling it has produced.  I try to remind the body of its normal function by setting the stage with relaxing/safe elements, and then lead it through passive, active and resisted activities.   And follow up by assigning exercises that will re-enforce that. There are only so many things the body can do. We take the body through these activities in order to start a dialogue. A dialogue with words like – rest, slack, stretch,  move, stimulate, sense, resist and strengthen.  I try to build windows of time where there is an altered signal or decreased signal, so the body can get back to doing what it loves to do…homeostasis. I monitor all of it through range of motion and pain scales. It is not rocket science;) Of course it can get more complex when you start building in limitations and conditions, but at its base its fairly simple.

Science can be a complicated system of testable questions and answers. There are entire systems in place to understand how to correctly ask the questions, let alone address  the answers. Rarely is it simple. It takes years to study, explore and even begin to understand even small parts of it. Naturalism however is beautiful in it’s simplicity. With 500-1000 hours of training and little time to test the application let alone question it, perhaps some of the answers lie there.

Starting with a few simple observations, perhaps we could make a safer, simpler, more ethical massage world. Here are some of the simple statements I keep in mind when practice daily.

  • Relaxation has value and potential.
  • The body is fine the way it is. Homeostasis works. For the most part the body will correct itself naturally, unless disease is present.
  • In the end, all change comes from internal function, not external force *other than trauma
  • Setting the stage for rest and digest may help remind the body that things are ok, which may let the person move more or differently, so they can get back to their normal.
  • Form is not necessarily representative of function.

What are the statement you practice under? More and more I see statements like “the science of massage”. Yet that statement is pretty misleading, when I think about what I do, as I am not really doing anything. I am simply setting the stage for what the body does for itself…naturally. Absolutely there is room for more advanced practitioners in advanced practice settings,  but at the core we need to get comfortable with who we are.

*I want to make a small disclosure here, as to the above statements of rehab. Rehab or rehabilitative exercise falls within the scope of an RMT (Canada). In no way do I advertise the practice of that here in NY, the example is based on my past experiences where it would be very normal for me to work with stroke patients, whiplash patients, etc combining manual therapy, movement and rehab exercise on my own. Your scope will depend on where you practice, and you should follow the local law to that effect.