Massage Therapists and the TCS NYC Marathon

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Massage Therapists and the TCS NYC Marathon

Introduction to the New York City Marathon and Massage

Every year we take part in the NYC Marathon by supporting runners in their health care journeys. We see runners of all kinds, new runners, experienced marathon runners, runners with disabilities who all have one thing in common, they think massage would be a benefit to their marathon training.

This year we were lucky enough to have one of our therapists Emanuel participate. Take a look at what he had to say about the experience.

The role of Massage therapists at the TCS NYC Marathon

Body Mechanics Sports Therapists Emanuel Gomez headshot
Emanuel Gomez

Hello there, my name is Emanuel Gomez, and I am a Licensed Massage Therapist and a Personal Trainer. I specialize in Sports Massage. I volunteered as a medical staff member for the 50th anniversary of the NYC marathon. This was a great opportunity to work alongside other medical professionals to help runners get back on their feet after running 26.2 miles. The kind of training you must have as a Licensed Massage Therapist for this particular event is how to treat an athlete post-competition. A lot of the athletes needed to be treated for muscle cramping and/ or muscular aches after the race. My job at the event was to assess the athletes to see whether the athlete was cramping due to dehydration, which was the case for many of them or if they experienced any muscular injuries throughout the race such as a tear for example, which can be treated through massage. From there you apply the appropriate massage treatment according to their condition. 

Why The Marathon Needs Volunteer Healthcare Workers

Emanuel at the Marathon

The volunteer experience was great and a bit intense since our tent was the medical tent where the more severe of cases were. The cases ranged from a mild muscle strain or cramping to complete dehydration and hypo/hyperthermia. One particular runner that we received was suffering from dehydration and hyperthermia and had a core temperature of 103 degrees. He had to be submitted to the ICU immediately.

In his case he seemed moderate upon arrival until he settled down. At first he felt cold and his legs were cramping. We gave him salt packages and Gatorade to alleviate the cramping and we provided gentle stretching and massage. But he then started to shiver aggressively. Our team applied heavy blankets on him and provided him with soup but he still wasn’t warming up. Our Captain Physician decided to take his rectal temperature and read 103. A more extreme treatment approach was needed. He was sent to the ICU where we monitored his heart rate and blood pressure. We applied ice packs to his axillary areas and groin to bring down his core temperature. An IV was inserted into his arm to continue to rehydrate him and eventually he recovered. This case was one of the more severe ones that we encountered.

          However, not all cases were like this. Depending on the degree of the runner’s condition we provided the appropriate treatment. If it’s muscle cramping or a strain, then that’s when LMT and PT get involved. We made sure we ran down a check list of conditions to an incoming subject to get a picture of what treatment the runner will receive. LMTs and PTs were amongst the busiest since we had to deal with the mildest of cases like muscle cramping and strains which were the more common of complaints.

Summing Up the Massage Therapist Role in the Marathon

After such a demanding event like the marathon, I recommend a post-event recovery massage approximately 24 to 48hrs after to mitigate DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) which can be debilitating especially for newer runners. I conclude by saying that this was a fantastic experience, to see all the disciplines from Physicians, to Podiatrists, to ER emergency workers, to PT and LMT to even Psychologists working together and performing their specialty in helping the athletes get better was very inspiring. Every medical staff member had a job to do in the marathon.

      This experience is great for old and new therapists who would like to work in a sports environment with a team of other disciplines. If you do decide to participate as a volunteer in future marathons, prepare to be on your feet all day and moving around as you will be going from station to station helping runners. Typically, the day will be long, we are talking from 8 30 to about 6 30pm.

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Massage Therapy Treatments for Low Back Pain

Introduction to back pain

Low back pain is surprisingly common among all Americans and is one of the foremost reasons we miss work. Based on that it is not surprising that we are always looking for ways to solve, treat, or rid ourselves of nagging back pain. The truth is though, our medical system is not the best at treating it.

I am a massage therapist and I love massage therapy but I will be the first to tell you, the number one recommended treatment for back pain is not massage therapy; it is movement. Let’s first clarify what I mean by “recommended.” When I say that what I mean is supported by research and recommended by experts in back pain. Unfortunately that does not mean that recommendation is actually reaching the people in pain. Our medical system is so saturated with other noise that it’s hard for people navigating within the system to find what is best for them.

When you’re ready to a seek medical Massage Therapy Treatment

I gave a short list of questions to go through in a previous post so here’s a condensed version. If you are coming into Body Mechanics for back pain the first thing you need to know is; it is best to come in 3-5 days after an initial injury. You need to be able to lie comfortably on the table during treatment. Please come in unmedicated as well. It is very important that you can accurately feel what is happening to your body while receiving your massage. If you are coming in for more chronic kinds of back pain, the kind that rears its ugly head every once in a while but that you  are very familiar with, you can come anytime – but you may want to time your visit based on the cycle of this chronic pain.

Low back pain can be nonspecific but even without a diagnosis, we can divide it up into a few subcategories:

  • Back pain that is more related to the hip
  • Back pain that is more sacral
  • Back pain that is more located around the spine
  • Pain that is more muscle spasm related to the area between the hip and the last ribs.

We can get into the individual diagnosis, but it may not matter so much in terms of massage therapy because we are treating symptoms. For example, you may hear that massage therapy is treating any of the following: sacroiliac joint pain, labral tears, bursitis, tendinopathy, disc degeneration, disc herniation, nerve impingement or stenosis.

Saying we are treating a spesific pathogy is slightly off  base. We are more managing your body’s response to its pathology.

Massage Therapy for Back Pain that is hip-dominant or is stemming from labral tear, cam impingement or other hip dysfunction

It is important to note that even though the issue may be in the hip, the pain might be felt in other areas, this is called referred pain

We treat back pain that stems from the hip will in a slightly different way than a back injury. Functionally, this type of pain often appears to create spasm in the glutes, the rotators of the hip and the piriformis. It is essential that a massage address these areas fully. Ideally, and with sufficient time, the hamstrings and the back would also need to be treated.

The area should be thoroughly warmed with massage and/or a heating pad first. Restoring internal and external rotation to the hip through range of motion, active release and mobilizations often significantly helps relieve symptoms. Additionally, as the muscles have a lot of bulk, the glutes need to be treated. I frequently work by creating a lot of slack by putting clients into what I call the “froggy position.” I find it helps to relive the trigger points without causing the patient a lot of undue pain. Depending on the type of injury, relief might be temporary or longer-lasting.

Hands massaging the low back
Body Mechanic Licensed Massage Therapist treating hip-dominant pain

Using Massage Therapy Treatment to treat Back Pain that is from Acute injury

If you are coming in for an acute injury treatment is far different. Ideally you would be coming in after you have a diagnosis, and you are out of the initial stages of healing (again, we recommend 3-5 days after injury.) There must be no open wounds, active infection or swelling. That being said, if you are too uncomfortable for massage in the area that is directly affected, there is a fair bit of research that indicates that working with one area of the body can affect another. Check out this research on stretching the hamstrings affecting neck’s range of motion.

Essentially, a massage therapist who is skilled is going to be able to get you more comfortable while you heal. They’ll do this by working on another body part and by just generally relaxing the nervous system. 

Massage for acute areas of pain must be gentle, and focus on relieving discomfort rather than gaining function. Heat or ice may be applied to the back depending on what feels better. Soft strokes such as effleurage, scooping, and techniques that lift the surface of the skin like cupping, might all be utilized. As the massage expands towards the periphery, the strokes can become deeper. If movement is in the therapist’s scope of practice, breathing and tense and relax exercises can all help to signal to the body that it is time for the area that is affected to relax and un-brace. 

Addressing chronic back pain with Massage Therapy Treatment

Massage for back pain that is from a chronic injury is where massage therapy really excels. It is generally safe to use a wide variety of depth, massage strokes and movement. The hips, low back, glutes, and mid-back can all be treated safely and effectively. Ideally, due to their size and potential to create tension in the back, the glutes and rotators are treated first with both movement and massage. Then the therapist would move on to treat the erector muscles along the spine and quadratus lumborum (the deepest abdominal muscle) with stripping and trigger point therapy.

Since therapists have the option to choose from many massage therapy modalities, the best techniques to use are the ones that 1) The patient enjoys, and 2) Are most effective for the situation. Some people naturally respond better to movement, tense and relax, stroking, trigger point or fascia work. Here good listening skills both with the hands and the ears are very useful in deciding how to proceed.

Sacroiliac joint issues and Massage Therapy Treatments

Massage therapy for SI joint issues has a very different plan than other massage therapy plans. The SI joints are small joints to the left and right sides of the sacrum. They have very little movement, and in fact over time, the movement reduces, but they cause a great deal of pain for many people. Since the pain is radiating from a bony area that often feels inflamed and pinched, many people feel relief through ice application to the joint.

Additionally, since it is a joint, we can relieve the tension on it by making sure the muscles around it are relaxed. Treating the quadratus lumborum and the glutes (specifically the cute medius) seem to provide the most relief. Massage and stretching can be applied to these areas to provide the sensation of even pressure across the joint, which helps to relieve the pain.

Summing up

Beret Loncar Massage Therapist, Personal Trainer and Yoga Therapist

There are many different kinds of low back pain and they can present in different ways. While movement is the best way to address it, I think I’ve pointed out some specific and effective ways Massage Therapy can be used to help people in pain. Provided the therapist pays close attention to what kind of massage techniques are safe. Based on where the issues are stemming from and listening closely to the patient’s body and preferences, massage therapy can be a helpful treatment. If you would like to talk to us about what treatment options are right for you, you can reach out to us, send an email at info@BodymechanicsNYC.com!

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Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Can Massage Therapy Help My Lower Back Pain?

Can Massage Therapy Help My Lower Back Pain?

Can massage therapy help my pain? The answer to this question is more complicated than you would think. Massage Therapy research is all over the map. For starters, there are some inherent conflicts with the studies because people LIKE massages. And people are more likely to choose massage over another treatment that they do not like, even if something else could be more effective.

Back Pain is Common

To examine how others have answered the question, let’s start by taking a look at lower back pain in general. Did you know it is normal to have some pain sometimes? Lower back pain is the 2nd most common cause of disability in the USA and a surprisingly common cause of missed work. 80% of Americans will have an episode of low back pain in their lifetime. So you are not alone if your back is feeling achy and sad. 

Back Pain is Often Non-Spesific

Medical professionals are historically bad at treating lower back pain. You might have experience with a doctor suggesting a list of seemingly unrelated treatments for your pain, like throwing a dart at a target with their eyes closed, hoping for a bullseye. That may be because the WHO lists that 60-70% of back pain is “Non-specific,” meaning the cause is unknown. cause.  If we do not know what the cause is, planning the treatment becomes extremely difficult. The National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke lists about 30 different possible causes and contributing factors to back pain alone. 

Research is Complicated and Low Quality

To complicate matters, though massage has excellent research supporting the treatments of both depression and anxiety, the research is rather underwhelming in the area of back pain. Instead, movement is often the recommended treatment. However, massage can incorporate things that are not massage; On table exercise, stretching, mobilizations, and resistance might also be included in your message. So the research that measures the effectiveness of just massages on back pain, isn’t really accurate when a therapist is including these other treatments to help you recover.

Body Mechanics Sports Massage Therapist Matt performing a lower back massage NYC
Sports Massage Therapist Matt massaging a client’s back. Photo credit Adam Ninyo

Pain is Complicated

Muddying the matter further, pain in your back may not solely be caused by an injury. Going back to that WHO the number of 60-70% of back pain being nonspecific, many of us have back pain that chronically exists and isn’t a reaction to a movement or standing or bending. Pain is generated for a number of reasons, the number one being to protect you. Your nervous system takes into a number of variables such as your medical history, your environment, your mental state, your sensitivity, your general physical health and more, before it generates pain as a warning. 

So how do you know if massage is for you and your  back pain?

It is a hard question. I suggest you ask yourself the following:

Massage therapist treating low back pain

  1. Is it safe? I recommend having a diagnosis from a doctor and being out of the range of acute pain before coming in. Even when the diagnosis is “non-specific back pain,” it’s important to rule out other injury as the culprit. Being able to lay still and be touched for the duration of the massage is important, so if your back is too sensitive to touch, wait a day or two.
  2. Am I seeking an alternative route of pain management? When natural and over-the-counter options aren’t up to the task, massage can be a powerful ally in pain mitigation.
  3. Do I like it? If you enjoy being touched and it makes you feel safe, that can be advantageous. Our mental well-being affects the physical, so the boost from treating yourself and the physical connection of massage could help with your pain.
  4. Am I using it in addition with another rehab? If you are in physical therapy, massage can loosen up tight muscles and make a big difference in increasing ease of movement.
  5. Am I additionally stressed or depressed? If you’re burning the candle at both ends or in a stressful time, massage might really help. The trauma of being injured itself can be very stressful and so managing that can be a huge boost to recovery.
  6. Has massage worked for me before? If you have a history of massage working for you it is a good bet that it will work again!

If you answered yes to a few of those questions, then massage therapy might be a great choice for you and your back pain. Check out our booking options for medical massage to see if is right for you:) 

Stay tuned for our next blog on what goes into a good massage for back pain.

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Sports Massage Therapist Profile – Emanuel

Body Mechanics welcomes new Sports Massage Therapist Emanuel to the team! With experience in martial arts, sports, and training, Emanuel has many sources of knowledge to pull from when taking on a client! We spoke with him to get to know him a little better.

What is your background in sports? Do you train? Participate? Watch?

Emanuel – My background in sports is a diverse one. I have played football for years, was on my high school track team, and I practice several forms of martial arts. I am not competing in anything as of yet but never say never! There may be a future where I step up my training and can join another team, but for now my focus is on sports massage.

How long have you been training?

Emanuel – I’ve been training my body in one way or another since I was a teen. Practice between games, runs in the morning before school and on the weekend, with regular gym days in between. as well. Exercise is very much an important part of me. I make sure I train no less than 3 times a week keep my mind and my body sharp.

Keeping his training schedule helped keep Emanuel sane during quarintine

Can you share one experience, as a person who knows their body, that has greatly impacted  the way you approach  massage?

Emanuel – One experience I have gone through that has impacted the way I approach  sports massage therapy was being treated by a massage therapist after a pretty bad back injury. I was sparring and was tossed by my partner. I took the fall pretty bad and I knew something was wrong. I saw several doctors but there was nothing to operate on, so all they did was give me painkillers. Finally the 3rd doctor I saw recomended a massage therapist. During the assesment she saw that I was limping and that my hips were uneven and went to work on me. I was sore aftetwards but after a couple of days I was limping or feeling the same pain in my back.

From then on I saw massage therapy as something that everyone could benefit from. I think it should be normal as going to the dentist.

How did you get into sports massage? 

Emanuel – I got into sports massage because as a personal trainer I wanted to further help people. I would often see similar injuries among my clients and sometimes I’d even be there when the injury happened! I wanted to be able to give them more help than telling them to ice it. Thanks to my training I know the anatomy even better. So now when I am treating a client who is active at the gym a lot or plays sports, I am in a better position to understand their injury and how to treat it. 

What is your best uh oh story? A time you really messed something up with your body.

Emanuel – I wouldn’t say “best” but my most memorable “uh oh” story was when I broke my ankle in football practice back in High School. I thought I had just sprained it at first, so I got up to walk off and ice it. When I tried to take a step I said to myself “UH OH!” realized I couldn’t walk and had to be assisted off the field.

What sets your sports massage apart from anyone else?

Emanuel – What sets my sports massage apart is my ability to pay attention to detail and communication. I believe if I’m in tune with what the patient is experiencing they will receive the best treatment.

If you could try any sport/or amazing physical activity what would it be?

Emanuel – One sport I would love to try is Gymnastics. It takes a TON of strength, coordination and stamina to pull off those routines.

What are your favorite kinds of people to treat and why?

Emanuel – I like treating athletes and other active people, especially people training for a game or competition. They usually want a very specific muscle group or body part to be worked on and I can focus on maximizing their results. I feel extra accomplished when they are satisfied with my work.

Is there anything we do not know about you we should?

Emanuel – I’m a huge video game fan, particularly fighting games like Mortal Kombat. 

If you had a super power what would it be?

Emanuel – It’s gotta be flight! Especially in New York City; I’d never have to wait for the train again!

If you want check out more of our therapists head over to our Massage Therapist Page and check them out!

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Plantar Fasciitis and Massage Therapy

Many years ago – in what seems like the Dark Ages, I was in school to become a registered massage therapist (RMT) in Ontario, Cananada and was taught a standard massage treatment for plantar fasciitis and runners. 

The massage therapy mostly focused on the foot. It involved stretching the plantar aspect of the client’s foot by cranking the toes into extension forcefully and pulling the bottom of the foot tight. Then while your client was face down and you had this position achieved, you were to take your thumbs or even an elbow and dig away at the tissue until you had eradicated all of the ‘granular’ scar tissue. 

I quite clearly remember my teacher saying that we needed to then ice the bottom of the foot immediately, as he slapped an ice pack on my friend who was a runner and triathlete. I remember her gingerly limping off post-treatment. I can’t remember how long it was before she ran again after that. Who knows?  No explaination was ever given for the method of treatment. They never explained that the purpose was to break down tissue and re-injure the site to facilitate healing. But it surely stank of that mode of treatment, and it did not make sense. 

Why do we need to hurt someone to make a massage work? 

Now let me ask you a question, a question that I will likely repeat in multiple blog posts: If you come to me, as a medical practitioner, and you complain of a black eye, and I punch you in the same eye and tell you it will facilitate healing, does that make sense? No! So why is it acceptable in massage? Certainly it applys to plantar fasciitis and massage. 

Massaging the leg for runners
Photo by Adam Ninyo

Years later, I now teach a very different method to address runner’s issues to the therapists at Body Mechanics. It is far more gentle, treats the entire lower leg as well as upper (depending on time constraints), engages the brain by moving the body, and involves a referral to PT or exercise depending on the level of experience the runner or athlete has. 

The Plantar Fasciitis Massage Treatment

When assessing, we are looking at a far wider spectrum of dysfunction than simply plantar fasciitis. Indicators that there might be an issue or impending problem include heel pain, pain in the bottom of the foot, and sometimes calf pain. Of course with any assessment, we screen to rule out red flags as well. The symptoms listed above can also correlate with a recent increase in mileage or speed work for runners, or a weight change, plyometrics or recent changes in health. If there is no connection to the assessment you’re probably going to want to refer out regardless to check for bone Spurs and tendon issues. 

For the purposes of this blog let’s focus on the lower leg. I generally combine in-prone, general massage with gentle pin and stretch. Having the patient flex and extend the ankle as well as pronate and supinate. I am looking to see a full articulation of the foot and ankle. Often you will see that those with foot pain also have poor articulation. Resistance in these areas can be added to help cue the body into moving better. Once we have warmed the area with massage and movement, adding resistance to those movements is helpful. While many massages focus on the muscles, at Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage I like to include tendon work, like “bowing,” as well. We want soft supple moving parts so practicing flexibility is helpful. 

When treating the bottom of the foot, I no longer use that awful stripping technique that requires an ice pack. Instead, I use a hot towel to warm the foot and then use a deeper gliding technique across the sole, while I have the patient flex and extend the toes, or spread them and let them fall to neutral. Here, if things are still not moving well we would add in some mobilizations between the tarsals and resisted exercises for the toes. 

As for home care, if the problem persists, we will refer you to a physical therapist and if it does not, then we would advise you to a program of foot and calf strengthening as injury prevention. As a massage therapist, I am not rehabbing you.  My job is to get you more comfortable while your body does what it does and what it was designed to do. It is adaptive. It will adapt, with or without me.

Summing up…

A warm towel? Simple exercises? No digging thumbs or elbows into the client’s foot? This is a far cry from the painful techniques that I was taught! No one is limping painfully off our tables before a run. The clinical outcomes seem just as effective and I’d say are more beneficial. If you are looking for a therapist who will not hurt you to help you, ask questions before you book. Look for someone who listens well and has a wide variety of techniques at their disposal. It would be a shame to miss your next run due to foot pain… especially if it was caused by the person trying to help you.

Check out more on plantar issues

 

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Sports and Medical Massage Therapist Profile – Zachary

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage is happy to introduce you to another new member of our team! Meet Zachary – a dancer, performer, mover and shaker. Zachary’s expressive and empathetic personality assists him in getting to the root of the problem with his clients, to fix issues they weren’t even aware were causing them distress.

Zachary gave us a peek behind the curtain as to what makes his sports massage therapy special and effective.

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage Sports Therapist Zachary
Zachary Koval Sports Massage Therapist

What is your background and what drew you to sports?

 Zachary – I was a soccer player growing up and I competed in the NYC triathlon a few years ago. I was also a personal trainer for several years, and have spent a good portion of my life in the weight room doing resistance training.

How long have you been training or working at it?

ZacharyBeing healthy and using my body to its fullest potential has been something that I’ve always enjoyed and been focused on. As I witnessed my father deal with chronic pain, illness, and physical disability through the years, I took it as inspiration to work (and play) to make sure my own body would last and allow me to enjoy every moment with it.

Can you share one experience as someone who uses their body, that has greatly impacted your massage?

ZacharyI first fell in love with bodywork through learning Thai massage. I was introduced to it as a recovery modality in the acro-yoga community I was a part of. In Thai massage the practitioner uses their whole bodies to stretch and support the receiver with acupressure and assisted yoga postures. It becomes almost a dance between the two.
I carry that energy and intention in my work, as I integrate my training and my own movement practices, even while just using my hands. There is a silent dialogue, conversation, and dance that is occurring, that provides a fluidity and deep connection throughout my work.

What is your best “Uh-oh!” story? A time you really F-d up doing something with your body that helped inform your medical massage technique.

Zachary –  I’ve often been of the personal mindset to just push through the pain. But in training for the triathlon, my body definitely got over taxed and I quickly learned the importance of allowing time for recovery and self-care

What are your favorite kinds of people to work on? 

 Zachary People who either already have a strong connected sense to their body or are open to developing that mind-body connection. Not everyone is able to articulate where, exactly, their pain but through a bit of light conversation I can phish the info out of them during their sports massage, but the ones who know exactly how I can help them are my favorites.

If you could try any sport/or amazing physical activity what would it be? 

Zahary I love gymnastics! Shapes and poses that seem to defy gravity, and yet through dedication and training somehow go from feeling impossible to becoming possible. And for a sport- I’ve always wanted to try Kitesurfing.

Tell us a little bit about some of the other hobbies you enjoy

ZacharyI’m a mover and dancer. Active in many ways- yoga and acro yoga, cycling, swimming, hiking, dancing, contact improv. I’m also a performer and love working in collaborative and physical theatre.

What sets your sports massage apart from anyone else?

Zachary I find that having a strong somatic understanding of my own body, combined with anatomical and physiological knowledge, has led to an strong intuitive sense of how to work with others’ bodies. By moving, stretching and sometimes injuring my body over the years, when a client and I narrow down their issue I can work fluidly through all the sports massage modalities I have trained in, from swedish to myofascial or neurofascial release, to trigger point orThai, to work out their issues with the perfect method.

Is there anything we do not know about you we should?

ZacharyI traveled across the country for a year after college dressed as Baloo the bear, performing in and directing children’s theater.

If you had a superpower what would it be?

ZacharyThe ability to pause time so that I could read and learn uninterrupted.

What was the last book you read?

ZacharyThe Overstory by Richard Powers. Life changing. Highly recommended.

Take a look at our other massage therapist profiles!

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Six Easy Ways to Get The Most Out of Your Massage Therapy

Want to get a great massage?  We put together a list of six super easy ways to make sure you are getting the most out of your massage therapy experience.

 

Massage can be great…it can also be miserable. Just browse through Google reviews or Yelp reviews and you will see experiences that run the gamut between amazing and horrific. In between the lines of those reviews there are frequently experiences that did not have to be bad, but were created by a series of misunderstandings or misinformation. Sure you might get a dud of a massage therapist now and again, or someone on a bad day but the majority of Massage Therapists are professionals who want to give you what you want. We put together this list of easy ways to get the most out of your massage experience to help paitents and clients navigate how to avoid some of the common problems that come up on review sites.

 

1. Arrive on time: Actually arrive 10-15 minutes early, especially if it is your first time. Frequently customers think they have purchased an hour of time. What they do not realize is that that hour of time is very specific to it’s time slot. If you booked a 5pm for one hour, your hour starts at 5 pm. Arriving at 5pm and then needing to use the restroom, fill out paper work and check in, will cut into that time. Paper work is a big time suck. Even at a gym or salon there might be some liability forms to fill out, so err on the 15 minute side of early if it is your first time at a location. Additionally you might consider asking have them send you the paper work in advance or if it can be done online. One of the big complaints we see online is that the appointment was cut short. Generally this will not happen so long as the customer has arrived with time to spare, this is literally getting the most ‘time’ out of your massage. (if it does then see suggestion number 6)

 

2.  Advocate for yourself: There are MANY different depths and styles of massage. Before most sessions your therapist will either take a medical history, ask your likes or dislikes, and what you want to focus on. Some processes are more thorough than others…but whereever you are, this is your time to speak up and make your needs known. You do NOT want someone else’s massage. You want the massage you want. If you like a head massage, let the therapist know. If you do not want your new blowout touched, let the therapist know. Asking a questions about what will be massaged and what will not be is another good way to go. “Full body” does not mean the same things to all people, so try instead to say things like “I would really like I would really like a massage that focuses on my back, legs, calves, arms and neck, I do not care so much about my hands and feet”. Clarity of words can go a long way to clearing up any misunderstandings and having an experience where your legs were mysteriously left out.

Come in with a plan. Knowing what you want ahead of time will save you time and money. If your goal is to relax, that is totally valid, but a ‘full body’ can be made very un-relaxing by your therapist chatting away. Stating what you came in for can be really helpful to both you and for your therapist in order to get what you want. Same things goes for sports massage and medical work. Let your therapist know both your long and short term goals so that they are not guessing at what you want. Some people are terrible guessers.

 

3.  If you are sick or have a possibility of a schedule change, let reception know ASAP. Most places have cancelation policy’s. Those policies are often more lenient the earlier reception knows there might be an issue. If you wake up with the sniffles or your boss throws a curve ball,  give the reception a shout as soon as you know…they might be able to do you a solid. When you wait till an hour or two before your massage because you waited to see if you could really come, you are not going to find much flexibility.

 

4.  Be forthcoming in your injury history and health history:Things that may not seem like a big deal to you, such as that trick shoulder that separates when you put your arm over head, might cause a serious problem if your therapist does not know. Sure you have had it all your life, but this is your massage therapists first time seeing it. Medications are equally important. There is no judgment, but some medications can leave you at risk for bruising, blood pressure complications, and injury. Most complications are easily avoided just by knowing the medication, so please be honest.

 

5.  Do not come in medicated, drunk or high: Massage therapists are supposed to legally send you home if you are altered in any way…and you will probably be charged a fee. Even if your therapist does take you after a few boozy lunch drinks, it may be because they are not exactly sure if you are or are not altered. The likely outcome is, they are not going to give you the massage you want, instead they are wondering if they should be sending you home and giving you the most conservative massage possible. If you have medications you’re taking for an injury and that is what your coming in to be seen for, then call ahead and ask about them. Any medicine that alters your sense of touch or judgment, is a no-go for massage because it may increase your ability to be injured.

 

6.  Complain…but start at the right place first. Businesses are not perfect. No one wants you to have a bad time. Seriously, a business is only as good as their customer service. If you had a bad experience or feel you were somehow wronged, reach out to a manager. Frequently I hear stories where a customer might have mentioned something to reception…and you should totally do that since they are sitting there, but know that not all reception knows that means you needed help. Receptions job is to take payments and greet, often they will be overtasked and not realize you complained at all, or that that complaint should be passed on. Politely asking for a managers email is totally ok, and it will get you the fastest resolution. For small businesses, they are often grateful for this approach as they WANT to find out about problems before they hit the fan. With larger businesses you may indeed have to go to social media to get someone’s attention….but this is rarely the case with self run businesses or businesses that are not chains.

Every massage is going to be a little different. It is important to keep in mind, we do this every day as massage therapists but it may be a special day for you…Hopefully this guide helps you navigate our world of massage therapy a little better.

To book an appointment, or ask us a question about our practice find us here on our Contact and booking page.

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Sports Massage Therapist Profile Interview

Check Out Our Sports Massage Therapist Sharon!

sport massage therapist Sharon

We do this profile for our therapists now and again so that you can get to know them and get a little more information on who they are and what they do. Many of our therapists not only work in sports massage but also are athletes themselves. So here we go!

What is your background in sports?

Sharon: I have always enjoyed movement and have tried different kind of sports, even field hockey at one point, but lately I am really into yoga. I specifically train in arial yoga, circus, and silks. 

How long have you been training at your sport?

Sharon: I took my first arial class in 2013, but really started to get serious about it in 2015. I am now teaching arial yoga.

Can your share one experience as someone who uses their body that has greatly impacted your sports massage?

Sharon: Training in aerial can sometimes contribute to some weird imbalances. Especially if you are training for a performance sequence. However, I am a big fan of movement variability. Because of this I try and make sure BOTH sides of the body are worked in a sports massage, not just the side that has the issue. 

How long have you been training at your sport of choice?

Sharon: 5-6 years

What is your best uh oh story?

Sharon: One of the most significant injuries I have had is pretty recent. I inured my right shoulder so badly that it took me out of any regular movement practice. It gave me a deep appreciation of shoulder injury.  

How did you get into sports massage?

Sharon: When deciding our final semester practical, I decided to train as an LMT at the Joffery Ballet School. It was after that experience that I realized I really wanted to work with athletes and dancers. 

Are there any athletes you admire?

Sharon: Misty Copeland is pretty cool and inspiring!

Other than sports massage is there anything else you really enjoy working on?

Sharon: I LOVE working with the prenatal population. 

Is there anything else about you we should know? (odd ball facts and such?)

Sharon: Oh, I can hula hoop, play the ukelele while singing at the same time.

Sharon has now been on our staff for 1 year! Congratulations Sharon, you have grown leaps and bounds and worked hard for it. If you want to book a session with Sharon for sports massage, medical massage or prenatal massage you can find us online on our booking page!

You can also find more about Sharon in her therapist profile here.

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

 

 

 

 

Sports Massage Profile Gerry

Get to know our sports massage therapist Gerry!

We asked our sportsports massage therapist nyc gerrys massage therapist, Gerry, a few questions so you can get to know him a little better. Here is what he had to say!

What is your background in sports, since you are working in sports massage currently?

Gerry: I used to race and I was a bike messenger, back when that was a thing in New York.  I also spent some time snow boarding.

If you could try any sport what would it be?

Gerry: Motorcycle racing!

How did you get into sports massage as a thing?

Gerry: I have a curiosity about the way people move and want to help them.

Are there any athletes your particularly admire? 

Gerry: Peter Sagan, he is a professional road bicycle racer.

Is there anything that sets your massage apart from anyone else?

Gerry: I hope it is my sensitivity

Do you have any specialized training that you are really drawn to?

Gerry: While I love working with athletes, I also work with geriatric paitents and that work is really inspiring. 

Is there any special skills or hobbies you want us to know about, something people would be surprised to know?

Gerry: I am really good at backgammon and swing dancing.

Last but not least, if you could have a super power, what would it be?

Gerry: I would want to fly of course!

 

If you want more information on Gerry you can find it on our therapist profile page.

To book an appointment see our prices page.

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

 

 

 

 

 

Sports Massage Therapy Profile -Laura F.

Get to Know One of Our Sports Massage Therapists, Laura!

We are asking our sports massage therapists for a little extra information so that you can get to know them and their experience in sports massage.

 

So here it goes!

First off Laura, What is your background in Sports?

Laura: I have been working in the field of sports massage for 30 years.  I am not just a massage therapist but I am also a personal trainer, and I train myself.  I have played a number of sports… including boxing, running, and lifting.  If you are coming in for these things, I have a pretty good understanding of what is going on. 

What is your best “uh oh” story in regard to injury?

Laura: When I moved from LA to NYC, I (bleeping) fell on some black ice and I tore my left medial meniscus.  That was awful and it was a long recovery. 

If you could try any sport now, without limitations, what sport would it be? 

Laura: Krav Maga!

How did you get into sports massage?

Laura: When I was at Swedish Institute in NYC, I was bored with the relaxation massage and energy work I was learning.   I had an an instructor who taught sports massage and she was incredible.  That’s when I knew that was what I wanted to do. 

What are your favorite kinds of ‘sport’ people to work on now?

Laura: I love to work with dancers, but I also just love people who are active and want to take care of their bodies. 

Are there any athletes that you particularly admire?

Laura: Manny Pacquiao and Michael Jordan.  They are my favorites!

What sets your sports massage apart from everyone else’s sports massage?

Laura: (laughs) Honestly, I do not compare myself.  I just studied hard and took advanced courses.   I truly care about helping people in pain, and teaching them how to learn about their bodies.  As a trainer, I can also suggest some ways they might prevent hurting themselves. 

And last but not least, are there any other things we should know about you?

Laura: I am also a certified life coach.

To book with Laura, you can book online at this location, or you can read more about her Massage therapy and Sports massage there.

 

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage, 1 W 34th St, #204, , New York, NY 10001, United States (US) - Phone: 212-600-4808 Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com URL: https://www.bodymechanicsnyc.com/