Sports Massage Profile Gerry

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Sports Massage Profile Gerry

Get to know our sports massage therapist Gerry!

We asked our sportsports massage therapist nyc gerrys massage therapist, Gerry, a few questions so you can get to know him a little better. Here is what he had to say!

What is your background in sports, since you are working in sports massage currently?

Gerry: I used to race and I was a bike messenger, back when that was a thing in New York.  I also spent some time snow boarding.

If you could try any sport what would it be?

Gerry: Motorcycle racing!

How did you get into sports massage as a thing?

Gerry: I have a curiosity about the way people move and want to help them.

Are there any athletes your particularly admire? 

Gerry: Peter Sagan, he is a professional road bicycle racer.

Is there anything that sets your massage apart from anyone else?

Gerry: I hope it is my sensitivity

Do you have any specialized training that you are really drawn to?

Gerry: While I love working with athletes, I also work with geriatric paitents and that work is really inspiring. 

Is there any special skills or hobbies you want us to know about, something people would be surprised to know?

Gerry: I am really good at backgammon and swing dancing.

Last but not least, if you could have a super power, what would it be?

Gerry: I would want to fly of course!

 

If you want more information on Gerry you can find it on our therapist profile page.

To book an appointment see our prices page.

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

 

 

 

 

 

Sports Massage Therapy Profile -Laura F.

Get to Know One of Our Sports Massage Therapists, Laura!

We are asking our sports massage therapists for a little extra information so that you can get to know them and their experience in sports massage.

 

So here it goes!

First off Laura, What is your background in Sports?

Laura: I have been working in the field of sports massage for 30 years.  I am not just a massage therapist but I am also a personal trainer, and I train myself.  I have played a number of sports… including boxing, running, and lifting.  If you are coming in for these things, I have a pretty good understanding of what is going on. 

What is your best “uh oh” story in regard to injury?

Laura: When I moved from LA to NYC, I (bleeping) fell on some black ice and I tore my left medial meniscus.  That was awful and it was a long recovery. 

If you could try any sport now, without limitations, what sport would it be? 

Laura: Krav Maga!

How did you get into sports massage?

Laura: When I was at Swedish Institute in NYC, I was bored with the relaxation massage and energy work I was learning.   I had an an instructor who taught sports massage and she was incredible.  That’s when I knew that was what I wanted to do. 

What are your favorite kinds of ‘sport’ people to work on now?

Laura: I love to work with dancers, but I also just love people who are active and want to take care of their bodies. 

Are there any athletes that you particularly admire?

Laura: Manny Pacquiao and Michael Jordan.  They are my favorites!

What sets your sports massage apart from everyone else’s sports massage?

Laura: (laughs) Honestly, I do not compare myself.  I just studied hard and took advanced courses.   I truly care about helping people in pain, and teaching them how to learn about their bodies.  As a trainer, I can also suggest some ways they might prevent hurting themselves. 

And last but not least, are there any other things we should know about you?

Laura: I am also a certified life coach.

To book with Laura, you can book online at this location, or you can read more about her Massage therapy and Sports massage there.

 

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage, 1 W 34th St, #204, , New York, NY 10001, United States (US) - Phone: 212-600-4808 Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com URL:

 

 

Strength & Conditioning for the Cyclist

 

By Ivan Garay LMT/CPT

Strength training can improve a cyclist’s performance and protect against injuries. Research on endurance athletes shows that strength training improves the three most important predictors of endurance sports performance[1]: economy (the ability to do a certain amount of work using as small amount of energy as possible), velocity/power at maximal oxygen uptake (How fast you can pedal on your endurance races), and velocity at maximal anaerobic running threshold (How fast you can sprint before burning out at top speed).

When designing a strength training program.You must first focus on correcting any imbalances in posture and movement patterns. The prolonged bent over position on the bicycle and miles of pedaling create common muscle imbalances in cyclist. They include tight/shortened muscles, the calves, psoas, quadriceps, hamstrings, lumbar spine, pectorals, upper trapezius, and neck flexor muscles. Along with these shortened muscles,there are weak/lengthened muscles, the tibialis anterior, gluteus maximus, abdominals, rhomboids, middle and lower trapezius, and neck extensor muscles.

Below is a sample routine that will balance muscles and improve cyclers posture:

First release tight muscles with foam rolling or active stretching:
Calves, psoas, quadriceps, hamstrings, lumbar spine, pectorals, upper trapezius, neck flexor muscles.

Follow by strengthening the weak muscles with resistance exercise:

  • Ankle Dorsiflexion with Cable or Tube Resistance
  • Barbell or Dumbbell Deadlift
  • Bridges
  • Dumbbell Rows with Shoulder Blades Squeezed (this exercises will reduce middle and upper back pain and soreness from long rides)
  • Neck Extension in a Quadruped Position (It will reduce neck pain from prolonged forward head position)
  • Planks
  • Side Planks

Brace your abdominals with every exercise. To perform an abdominal brace, pull your bellybutton toward your spine, tighten your abs without moving your body (as if you were about to be punched in the stomach).

Perform each exercise for 2 sets of 12-20 repetitions for muscular endurance.

Current research recommends that to increase cycling performance heavy strength training at maximal velocity[2] should be performed with multiple leg exercises for periods of greater than 6 weeks [3]. During a cycler’s off-season, high volume strength training should be performed two to three times a week and each exercise should be done for two to three sets for four to ten repetitions. You should rest two to three minutes between sets. Maximal results usually occur after an 8-12 week cycle of training. During competitive season your training volume should be reduced to 1 session a week with a lower volume of exercises but with the same high intensity to maintain strength gained from your off-season program[4].

Pick a heavy weight with each exercise and move as fast as you can during the concentric phase (lifting phase) and slow down during the eccentric phase (lowering phase of the exercise).

Off-Season Routine

  • One-Legged Squat
  • Barbell DeadliftDumbbell lunges
  • Standing Calve Raises
  • Barbell Rows
  • Seated Calve Raises
  • Chin-Ups
  • Bench Press
  • Barbell Shoulder Press
  • Dips
  • Dumbbell curls
  • Back Extensions
  • Planks
  • Side Planks

Competitive Season Routine

  • Barbell Front Squat
  • Standing Calve Raises
  • Barbell Rows
  • Bench Press
  • Dips
  • Dumbbell Curls
  • Planks

[1] http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-013-2586-y
See Reference Page for article citation

[2] http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-013-2586-y
See Reference Page for article citation

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23914932
See Reference Page for Article citation

[4] http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-010-1622-4
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2009.01035.x/abstract;jsessionid=8DA506016E22EA58C549B269A3F70D81.f03t03?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false
See Reference Page for Article citation

Strengthening and Conditioning for a Marathon

The right strengthening and stretching program is important when preparing for a marathon. Strength training has been shown to improve running economy, prevent injuries, and improve body composition and resting metabolic rates. Strength training is particularly important for older runners. Endurance exercise, like running, does less to protect against age related loss of lean muscle tissue than strength training.

When training for a race runners should perform one to two full-body strength sessions per week. Your workouts should be staggered around your key running workouts for the week. Avoid combining your strength workout with a hard speed session or long run on the same day. Research shows it could compromise your running workout and recovery[1]

Your strengthening routine should focus on two goals. First you must focus on correcting any imbalances in your movement patterns like over-pronation or over-supination. Read my last blog post on Plantar Fasciitis for the right exercises and stretches. Research has shown that a 1:1 strength ratio between your hamstrings and quadriceps is related to optimal running economy[2]. When performing leg exercises you can compare how much weight you can lift on the leg extension exercise versus leg curls. You need to strengthen the weaker of the two muscles. Most people have stronger quadriceps than hamstrings and will usually do only the leg curl, instead of both leg curl and leg extension exercises in a workout.

In addition to corrective exercises, your workout should aim at overall strengthening throughout the body to improve running economy and endurance muscle fibers. The following is a sample workout that incorporates both :

Lower Body

If you over-pronate during running do:
-Ankle Inversions with dorsiflexion using resistance tubing,
If you over-supinate, during running do
-Ankle Eversions with plantarflexion using resistance tubing

If your Quadriceps are stronger than your hamstrings do
-Leg Curls

If your Hamstrings are stronger than your Quadriceps do
-Leg Extensions
-Hip Adduction
-Hip Abduction
-Dumbbell Front Squat
-Barbell Deadlift

Upper Body

-Bench Press
-Dumbbell rows
-Dumbbell press
-Barbell Curls
– Planks(hold 30-60 seconds)
-Side Planks (hold 30-60 seconds)
-Do 2 sets of each exercise of 8-12 repetitions

For each upper and lower body exercise start with a weight heavy enough to allow you to reach 8 repetitions per set. Try to increase the reps every week. Once you can perform 12 repetitions with a certain weight, you can increase the load enough to allow you to do 8 repetitions again. Use the routine alongside your running training 1 to 2 days a week.

Provided by Ivan Garay LMT CPT
References

Eur J Sport Sci. 2014;14(2):107-15. doi: 10.1080/17461391.2012.726653. Epub 2012 Oct 3.
The acute effects intensity and volume of strength training on running performance.
Doma K1, Deakin GB.

Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000376,
Post Acceptance: January 28, 2014
Relationship Between Functional Hamstring: Quadriceps Ratios and Running Economy in Highly Trained and Recreational Female Runners.
Sundby, Øyvind Heiberg; Gorelick, Mark

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24533516
See references for specific citation information

[2] http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/publishahead/Relationship_Between_Functional_Hamstring_.97501.aspx
See References for specific citation information

Running Season– Treating Plantar Fasciitis

Exercises for Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis is one of the most common foot complaints. Technically what is happening is the plantar fascia is being over stretched or over taxed
Beret Kirkeby, “Treating Plantar Fasciitis”

plantar

Exercise for plantar fasciitis should reduce excessive strain on the plantar fascia and correct biomechanical faults that contribute to plantar fasciitis. Common biomechanical faults include over-pronation, flat feet, a tight Achilles tendon (especially from tight soleus muscles), excessive weight, and a high-arched foot. These imbalances are corrected with the right mix of stretching and strengthening exercises that bring the foot and ankle into correct functional alignment and movement. First, a general exercise routine for all people suffering from plantar fasciitis will be explained; followed by corrective exercise routines for specific common biomechanical imbalances.

General Routine

Before discussing targeted corrective exercises, most everyone with plantar fasciitis will benefit from relieving the strain from a tight Achilles tendon.  But because the body works as a whole, it’s important to not only stretch/work the muscle that directly attach to the Achilles tendon, but also the rest of the posterior chain muscles. (please see link for graphic) Treatment would start at the gluteal muscles, hamstrings, and then the calf. The figure below is the posterior chain of muscles that connect to the Achilles tendon. If you are seeking treatment for plantar fasciitis, it is important to note that it it begins in the hips. It is a common misunderstanding that it is the feet causing the issue. While the feet clearly play a role, the focus of treatment is not specifically the feet unless you are utilizing orthotics or working on foot mobility.

achilles-tendon

Imbalance or dysfunction in any segment of the posterior chain can produce excessive tightening of the Achilles tendon, so it is important to stretch each segment individually first and than end with a full posterior chain stretch like the Downward Dog yoga pose.
The following exercises are recommended in this order:

First, Stretch the Soleus (lower calve)soleus

Second, Stretch the Gastrocniemius (upper calve)
upper-calve

Third, Stretch the Hamstrings
hamstrings
Fourth, Stretch the Erector Spinae
erector-spinae

End with the Downward Dog Pose (will also treat the gluteus muscles)
downward-dog-pose

It’s best to use the Active-Isolated Stretching technique on each segment and end with holding the Downward Dog pose for 30-60 seconds. If you are unfamiliar with Active-Isolated Stretching, visit: http://www.stretchingusa.com/active-isolated-stretching

Exercises for Specific Biomechanical Faults

To understand biomechanical faults, let’s first look at the walking cycle. In a perfect walking stride, the person’s arch elevator muscles of the leg (tibias anterior, peroneus longus and tibialis posterior) work in perfect harmony with the plantar-flexors (gastric, soleus, etc.) to absorb, distribute and release stored kinetic energy. On heel strike, the arch elevators must fire eccentrically to decelerate and dissipate ground reaction forces via foot pronation and internal tibial rotation.

As the foot transitions from midstance into push-off, the toes begin to dorsiflex causing activation of the plantar fascia and associated muscles.

But if the muscles of the leg and ankle are imbalanced, the forces acting on the foot and ankle are not evenly distributed. This often results in excessive strain to the plantar fascia. Over pronation, a common problem causes excessive strain on the plantar fascia and often leads to flat feet.

Over Pronation and Flat Feet
pronation

If you are over pronating your plantar flexor muscles are often stronger and tighter than your arch elevator muscles. The arch elevator muscles of the leg (tibias anterior, peroneus longus and tibialis posterior) need to be strengthened. The following two exercises help to strengthen these weaker muscles.

ankle-inversion

An elastic band, rubber tubing, or cable machine are all good choices to provide resistance. Start the ankle inversion exercise in neutral and fully invert your foot slowly. Do 3 sets of 20 to 30 reps. The second exercise is for flat feet:

excersice-pronation

Sit on a chair so that your knees are at an approximate 90-degree angle with your feet on the ground. You’ll need a smooth floor so that the towel will glide easily. Spread the length of the towel in front of you and sit with your back straight and bare foot flat on the edge of the towel. The short end of the towel should be against the legs of the chair. Without moving your heel, contract your toes to bunch up the towel and draw it toward you (as shown) until you have done 2 sets of 10-20 repetitions of toe contractions or run out of towel. As the exercise becomes easier over time, begin adding a light weight to the end of the towel.

Excessive Supination and High Arch

ankle-eversion

Like the inversion exercise, a Thera-Band, tubing or cable machine will work well. Do 3 sets of 20 to 30 reps and move slowly throughout the range of motion. The second exercise for high arches involves a tennis or golf ball to release the muscles on the plantar surface of the foot.

ball-stretch

Place the ball under your foot and move the ball back and forth 20-40 times. Repeat on other foot (Note: roll only on the non-painful part of the arch, if the entire surface of foot is painful, avoid this exercise).

If you have any questions or comments on this topic, make sure to post them on our blog or email us directly.

Fitness information provided by Ivan Garay, a personal trainer. To book an appoinment for personal training, please contact his website: http://ivangaray.massagetherapy.com/

How to know what pain to not ignore. Pushing yourself to the limits.

As athletes we constantly push our bodies to the limits. Runners want to run longer and faster, lifters want more weight, yogis go for advanced positions, and some of us just do it all. We constantly test our mind and endurance by pushing beyond our comfort zones, and we have learned that often that push comes with a little pain. For most of us that means that when we feel uncomfortable-when we are at that edge where it hurts-we are celebrating our success at fighting the good fight. But if pushing it hurts, how do you know if you are really hurt?

Injuries often come in two forms: sudden injuries such as falls, collisions or tears; and insidious over-use injuries like tendinitis, plantar fasciitis, or knee-tracking issues. Whatever the cause is, its important as an athlete to know when you are really hurt. You should always check with your doctor about any issues you are unsure of, or any complications from pre-existing problems.

Here is how to tell the difference between a little pain and something that will take you out of the game.

1. If exercise makes it worse, not better. Wait, though, you think that sounds straight-forward, right? Well, this also applies to injuries that feel fine WHILE you exercise but begin to hurt a few hours later. Many serious over-use injuries DO NOT hurt while you are performing the activity but only after it is too late. The reason is the tissues warm up and lengthen, causing a deceptive pain feedback. As the muscles cool later in the day or overnight, and begin to lay down tracts of scar tissue, the fibers will contract and cause pain. Injuries like these are a catch-22 as exercise often makes them feel better for a short period of time. Check in with yourself, keep a journal about when and where the pain is occurring. If its always the same….watch out!

2. Pain that is point tender and gets worse while you exercise. Let’s be honest, folks, it is one thing to feel the burn, and totally another to have pain that grows and grows and grows. If your pain is progressive, it is a problem. Pull up; it just is not worth it. Ever hear that phrase “on your last nerve?” Well, you quite literally can be, and some things can’t be fixed. Get it checked.

3. Any time you feel numbness, tingling, or strange sensations in your limbs. Nerves are squirrely, when they are damaged it is not cut and dry. They may report LESS feeling or MORE feeling, but either one is a bad sign. If you are having any neurological systems its time to hit the Doc, not the gym.

4. Anything that hurts so bad the next day that an Advil won’t take care of. Many a great athlete has arrived in my studio hopped up on pain meds looking for relief through a massage, only to be booted out. If the pain is so bad you are digging through your cupboards for pain relief then you need to haul it to a Doc.

5. Injuries that come with a lot of heat and swelling. A little heat and swelling often come with extreme workouts like marathons, but most of you won’t be able to see it or feel it. Normal inflammation that comes with working out will resolve itself shortly after the workout. If it does not, or if you can visibly see swelling and feel the heat, it’s best to get it checked, and refer to your RICE protocol.

6. Any injury that comes with an audible noise. We all pop and grind occasionally, however any injury that comes with a noise and then pain, or alternately a noise and then LACK of feeling, is likely very serious. Be cautious, many muscle tears come with no feeling at all. The nerves are damaged and report back nothing, but you will likely hear the noise and it is accompanied by heat,swelling and sometimes a visible gap in the tissue. If muscle tears are to be repaired surgically , it must be done right away. Don’t wait if you suspect you have a problem.

If you are pushing it to the edge constantly, invest in preventive care or a trainer who can help you navigate this territory. It’s a good idea to get a yearly check up, and see someone regularly who has at least some medical training. You should also invest in an athlete’s emergency kit. No one ever said, “I am sure glad we did not have any band aids or ace bandages on hand for that”. And if you are competing, consider being a local hero and taking a first aid/CPR course at your local Y or community center. For many injuries early intervention is key, and your knowledge could save someones life. Now that is team spirit.

My Frustrations with Swedish Massage

One of my frustrations with Swedish massage is all the rubbing. This doesn’t mean that I believe that rubbing is not good for you. It is. Effleurage, J strokes, cupping (not the Asian kind), all bring a nice hyperemia to the skin. That rosy glow is associated with health, because it does indeed indicate that the blood is moving, and that is well….healthy. In the end, a therapist’s goal is essentially to create healthy tissue that functions as it should. So massage, in many ways, mimics the life of a moving body while you, the recipient of all that rubbing, lie there, semi conscious, smiling and sighing with relief.

Sometimes, however, I think rubbing is not enough, and by that I mean that maybe it‘s too much. Rubbing is a one-way dialogue; like a conversation between the hands and the body where the hands just won‘t shut up. Lost in all that self-centered movement is the listening part. Almost every “bad” massage I have had has been from someone who is rubbing, and not listening.

As therapists, we often talk about active-listening as part of our intake or interview skills, but it extends further than that. Even if the therapist is present for you during the hands-on part, the therapist still might not be listening. When I am working with new therapists, this is perhaps the hardest concept to impart to them. I want them to stop rubbing, essentially even stop moving, and let the client’s muscle do the work. This is hard for them to understand because if movement and pressure cause release, then more pressure should cause more release, right? Maybe not.

If the therapist is truly listening, he or she might feel that the muscle only releases on the exhale. Or maybe there is a flutter-like fan movement that indicates that the muscle is about to release, and the therapist just needs to stay there for a moment and coax it into relaxing. Or the muscle might release right away only to tighten up more, telling you that you should not be treating this person at all and you should refer them out for further diagnosis.

In our efforts to “Do” to “Fix” we often miss the obvious, which is the body is a self-cleaning oven; it is made to heal itself if given the right opportunity, and the right set of ears, aka hands.