Beret Kirkeby, Author at Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage : Sports Massage and Massage Therapy New York City

Yoga Therapy in a Clinical Setting

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Yoga Therapy in a Clinical Setting

Why Yoga Therapy? Ditching the Gym

A Message from Yuliana,

I am thrilled to be joining Body Mechanics as a yoga therapist. “What is Yoga Therapy“, you might be asking yourself as you read this. Yoga therapy as defined by IAYT, the governing board for yoga therapy, is the process of empowering individuals to progress toward improved health and well-being through the application of the teachings and practices of Yoga. An individualized assessment and individualized treatment protocol employing all of the modalities of yoga is provided by the yoga therapist to treat the client holistically. We believe these treatments are to complement whatever traditional treatments the client is undergoing.

 

COVID has chanYoga Therapyged our lives in ways we could never have predicted and the wellness industry is no different. Previously I had worked as a yoga therapist seeing clients in various yoga studios. In this climate, many of these studios are closed, many of them for good. These closures and the new stricter guidelines for the re-opening of businesses have created new challenges. It is within these conditions that working within a more clinical practice makes the most sense, if not also providing a path forward for yoga therapy overall. We should not lose access to Yoga and the connection to self, simply due to COVID. To be able to work within an integrative practice will provide clients with greater opportunity to truly provide a comprehensive wellness program that manages the challenges that we are currently facing.

 

The benefits of practicing Yoga Therapy or using Yoga as a therapeutic tool in this clinical space are many:

  • A controlled environment
  • OSHA level cleaning for surfaces and blankets
  • A private room with your therapist
  • No high traffic gym style common area
  • Personalized reception and booking
  • 1 on 1 assessment and application of the therapy
  • A window you can open for ventilation

 

Being a part of Body Mechanics, an established clinical Orthopedic Massage practice has made meeting the new strict guidelines less onerous. Like any clinical practice, many of the sanitizing requirements were already in place before COVID. As per the requirements for social distancing, clients are being scheduled to ensure the necessary social distancing. Like the philosophy of yoga therapy offering individualized treatment programs, Body Mechanics also offers each client a safe, clean, and all the mandated requirements of COVID for a very special experience.

If you want to read more about me, my practice and connect to other offerings you can explore my website at www.yulianakimgrant.com

Body Mechanics NYC

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

 

Women in Business. It is Harder Than You Think.

This is a post about being a woman in business.

It is a post about how far we have come and how far we have not. Full disclosure, if you do not like boobs or feel weird when woman breastfeed in public, you should probably stop reading…but I guess that’s the point of this blog entirely.

It is hard to be a woman in business.

I do not mean the sort of hard where you have to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and grow a thick skin, because I have done that. As an entrepreneur, my job is essentially having uncomfortable conversations in uncomfortable places and writing checks that are gulp worthy.  The kind of hard I mean is the kind where the playing field is uneven and you were not given boots, let alone bootstraps to pull yourself by.

My husband is a wonderful man and a terrible picture taker. Our phones are full of shots where I have one eye open, but every year he takes at least one shot where I feel he captured the moment unbelievably well. This blog contains the two pictures that I feel like best sum up the last 3 years of my life.

I had a daughter in 2018. I knew parenting would be hard…I did not know how deeply I would feel the total loss of myself and by extension, my business.  I spent most of my maternity leave multitasking to a level I did not know was possible. I was often working from home while pumping and holding a crying baby. I was protected in some ways financially through NYS Paid family leave (and if you are a self-employed person who would like to carry an insurance policy that will help you take a leave for bonding you can- most do not know this) but I was NOT protected emotionally.

When things got hard, I had a choice, take care of my daughter or take care of the business. I felt deeply the loss of control and freedom, there were weeks on end where I did not leave the house because, if the baby slept, then I had piles of work to do. People kept telling me, sleep when the baby sleeps…and I kept thinking how? My business would fail if I did. And no matter how much my husband ‘helped’, it was still helping. He was not shouldering the same burden I was…he was not on a 3-hour tether dependent on milk supply…and he did not have to ask if it was ok to leave the house. I did. Somehow it was all on me. I deeply resented that nothing had really changed for him, he had not had to give anything up to have a family. He was tired but happy.

I was not prepared, and 8 weeks of poorly paid maternity leave without child care is not nearly a good enough safety net. The only real thing I could do was take a pay cut by working less and not move forward as an owner. I was left wondering, is postpartum depression really a thing? Or do we just not adequately care for our mothers. It was simply put, a depressing and stressful time, but it had nothing to do with the act of giving birth. I felt like I missed out a lot of bonding with my daughter because of it. 

This year I had a baby at the height of the pandemic. At 9 months pregnant, I was sleeping 4 hours a night and having rolling panic attacks.  Hospitals in NYC announced that women would give birth unattended, leaving no one to make medical decisions for me or my child if there was a problem. I felt marginalized and it was very stressful. Afraid they would cut NYC off from the rest of the country, we left home for my in-laws in NJ.

I had also failed to secure funding in the first round of government loans called the PPP (Paycheck Protection Program), meant to help save small businesses. While helpful in theory, the loans were organized as first come first serve, and frequently the servers would crash while I was applying due to the crush of applications. The battle for financial survival was real. I stayed up at all hours frantically applying for grants. I  applied everywhere, for everything, and cried. I cried a lot. After multiple applications and failed attempts, I tweeted a reporter who helped me secure a loan.

Here is where things get interesting though…I received this loan the week before I gave birth. This loan was meant to be used in 8 weeks immediately post-funding (a funding that you were often not aware was coming–it just showed up) and it also required complicated payroll and legal administration for my twelve employees. I have no HR department or a full-time lawyer. Getting an accountant on the phone took a week…How was I supposed to administer these funds while in the hospital, or with a days-old newborn? The Cares Act, which is the bit of legislation that the PPP (the loan) was part of, made no accommodations for women who might be pregnant, or on maternity leave at the time of their funding. So if I was unable to use the money because I was otherwise occupied creating a human, I would miss out?? It is not a huge accommodation for them to make a single line of text granting exceptions for a business owner on medical leave, but no one even thought about the women owners out there. We are frequently unsupported and overlooked. I spent the week before birth, emailing and calling congress-people trying to get the PPP loan changed so I could use it outside of 8 weeks when I was recovered. I went back to work trying to save my business days after giving birth.

Having children ghosted me in some ways. I became invisible because I could not force my way in by brute alone. Instead, I have to run home and stay home in order to function. As much promise as NY offers; it is also a prison. With my child, I cannot leave my neighborhood if I am not strong enough to carry my child up and down the steps of the subway in a stroller. Certainly now with two, I cannot really go anywhere.  The world is not built for us here. As a woman, I have to run home every 3 hours because there is nowhere to pump breast milk safely if you are out and about. So I have to choose…what is more important, my infant’s health or my right to be out?  Women are frequently overlooked in legislation and in medicine. No doubt when the dosage for the vaccine comes out, that will be based on men as well.

The hard part is we have come so far. I remember celebrating when the paid family leave (my maternity leave) rolled out in NY…because finally we had some validation that we deserved some leave by law, but it is not enough. It makes no difference if I have leave, if when the leave is done I do not have child care. It makes no difference if I have leave if I do not have legislation that always considers women might be owners and mothers as well.  Why do we have to fight so hard for such basic things? We are half of the world. I pay my share just as much as anyone. Why have we come so far and it is not much at all??

 

ps. The PPP loan was turned into a 24-month program. I am still struggling at home with work-life balance, trying to save a company while having a newborn.

 

 

 

 

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage supports the LGBTQIA+ community

Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage has always been a place where inclusivity and diversity have been highly valued. However, as our collective education grows, we have come to understand that simply being accepting is not the same as being actively welcoming. This is why we would like to formally announce that Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage supports the LGBTQIA+ community as an official company policy.

People within LGBTQIA+ communities undergo high levels of stigmatization from both society at large and many medical providers. These continued failings have contributed to the harrowingly high rates of depression, anxiety, and suicide in LGBTQIA+ people. Among trans and non-binary adolescents studied, between ~30-51% of people report having attempted suicide. These are sobering statistics that reflect an endemic societal problem that does not treat vulnerable young people with the care or dignity that every person deserves.

We at Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage would like to assure everyone that regardless of who you are, we will respect: your body, your identity, and your experience. We have always recognized that one of the most important things a health care provider can do is validate the experience of the person in front of them. This simple act is tremendously powerful, and we promise we will always do this with every person who comes through our door.

As part of our commitment to being an inclusive space, we have made several changes recently.

  • Our online intake forms leave a place for your pronouns so that our therapists will know how to properly communicate about you with other providers if necessary.
  • Near the front desk, we have updated our signage to reflect that you should use whichever restroom facilities you are most comfortable with. Ideally, we would make the restrooms on our floor gender-neutral, but this is out of our hands because they belong to the building.
  • Additionally, all of our therapists will be undergoing continuing education on LGBTQIA+ issues from a biopsychosocial lens of care.

Being allies in the struggle for acceptance and equality is an ongoing process that we hope you will join us in. It’s very likely we will make mistakes in this process, and we ask that you hold us accountable so that we can become a more welcoming space for everyone. No one should have to worry about being judged when seeking massage therapy, and together we can build a space where everyone feels safe to be themselves.

Additional LGBTQIA+ friendly spaces:

Deep River Healing Arts- SohoDeep River Healing Arts is a private practice that provides thoughtful, educated therapeutic massage for all humans.  The founder is a queer-identified, biracial woman that wants especially to create a healing space for the LGBTQ+ community and people of color.  She specializes in massage for the transgender client, post-cancer treatment work, chronic pain management, and recovery from injury

If you want to be added to our list or you know someone who should be added, let us know!

More Resources-

Why pronouns are important 

Sexual minority women

Glossary of health care terms

Massage at our location during COVID-19

Welcome to your local Massage Therapy information page for Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage!

If you are reading this blog, you probably have some questions about whether or not it is safe to receive a massage in the time of Covid-19, and what our practice and our cleaning regimen looks like since opening. If you have been directed here by reception or management, it is so that we can put all the information you need in one place.

** UPDATE as of September 3rd, NYS allows services where you need to touch the face to take off their masks provided the practitioner has had a Covid test….we are NOT taking masks off in treatment. It is unnecessary and creates undue risk. However, we feel that the ruling is an EXCELLENT indication of how safe it is to have a massage at this point. We look forward to breathing a little more deeply with you all when the risk is over. 

In July, Phase 3 allowed massage therapy to open in New York City. You can see our initial announcement about that at the bottom of this page. We were given specific guidelines to follow in a multiple page document from Forward New York that included a summary, as well as a detailed explanation of how a business is supposed to operate to prevent the spread of Covid-19. The instructions provide a comprehensive outline of required cleaning, safety, and operations. If you want to see the full document, you can follow the links here.

Fortunately, we have always operated as a medical practice, so most of what was in the document was already being used by our facility in the routine care of universal and standard precautions ( the accepted standard for cleaning and disease prevention). Each of our rooms has always been equipped with 70% alcohol which is the CDC/OSHA standard for cleaning and disinfecting. We have also always had 30 minutes between appointments because I was used to hospital-based care and I did not think 10-15 minute breaks between patients was a reasonable time to clean, disinfect and do a full assessment. On a similar note, when we designed our space, all of the treatment room furniture was chosen to be able to be disinfected by chemical means. The chairs and tables may look nice, but we picked plastic for a reason. Now, of course, we are paying extra attention to cleaning things like light switches and buttons in addition to wiping down all of our tables and chairs. Rest assured, however, that we have and will always strive towards a medical level of clean, as that was how we were built.

So what are we doing, and what will you find to be different? 

  • All staff is masked, and you will be too, for the entirety of your treatment. Not to worry, we have multiple ways of making this very comfortable and have extra masks on hand if you need a spare.
  • Our staff is wearing scrubs/smocks so that they are not bringing outside transportation yuckies in.
  • We upgraded our booking platform to a new one that is completely paper-free and HIPAA compliant. No passing forms back and forth, no touching clipboards.  All of your notes are now online (if you are an old customer, we kindly ask you to start with a new health history and consent form- but do not worry, we have access to all of our old information as well).
  • You might also notice that our linens are a little brighter. Previously we used a local laundry company. We have switched to a hospital laundry service. Everything is packaged and handled for medical care. Our laundry was clean….now it is pristine.
  • Your temperature will be taken on arrival.
  • There is hand sanitizer provided in the rooms, not just at the desk, as it was pre-COVID.

There have also been some changes you may not see:

  • Reception is disinfecting the desk on a regular schedule
  • We now have tap and go EMV payments
  • The waiting room is technically closed so most people go directly to their rooms after a brief pause to have their temperature checked. Our office has always been low traffic, but you may not even see another customer now or just see them briefly. You can help us by showing up promptly 5 minutes before your appointment so we can keep that happening.
  • Our staff is testing regularly.
  • Each room and the lobby has a discreetly placed HEPA filter device
  • Reception is tracking visitors to our office who do not have appointments such as mailmen and pest inspection.
  • All of our bedding/extra pillows/pregnancy supports have been modified to allow for disinfecting, not just regular laundering. * For example, our pregnancy pillows for side-lying used to be double covered in pillowcases to protect you. Now the pregnancy pillow itself is made from vinyl and that is covered with a pillowcase. We had custom pillows made for this

We are happy to answer any specific questions you have…please ask!

Our Massage Therapy Clinic in NYC Opening in Phase 3

Massage Therapy Opens in Phase 3!

We have an important update to share! Massage Therapy is scheduled for phase 3 re-opening in NYC! Phase 3 may be as early as July 6th. We will tentatively start taking appointments now for that date on a modified schedule. Our front desk is not yet open so all appointments must be made online.

If the opening is delayed, we will work with our customers and reschedule any appointments.  Due to Covid-19, there will be some office changes. 

Both you and your therapist will be required to wear a mask for the duration of your visit. This is now New York State law for staying operational. If you do not have a mask one can be provided for you, but please let us know before you enter so that we can provide it. Your therapist will also be wearing clean scrubs as their new uniform. 


Your temperature will be taken when you arrive to make sure that you are not running a fever. Our therapists will have their temperatures taken daily, as well as having the government required COVID-19 tests on an ongoing schedule. Please let us know in ADVANCE if you have any symptoms so that we can appropriately reschedule you. We will still be maintaining a cancellation policy. If you fall ill, send us a doctor’s note and we can waive it. 

We have cleaned your space just for you. We always operated as a medical facility so this was not a big change for us. You will notice some small changes in our protocol in the way our linens are handled and some of the products we use. Additionally, our building HVAC system has been upgraded and a HEPA filtration has been added to each room.


We have also upgraded our booking platform to a streamlined HIPPA compliant system, have less contact, and have all of our notes online. Please be PATIENT with us. This is a process and we did this to keep everyone safer and have a long term better experience, but in the beginning, there may be challenges. Before your first visit, you will need to fill out updated paperwork. If you do not see your favorite therapist, they have yet to be added, check back in a week or two.

Thank you for waiting…we are excited to see you. 

Body Mechanics NYC

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

 

 

Racism is Both a Moral Issue and a Public Health Issue

Black lives matter image

 

Within the span of just the past few weeks, a number of Black Americans have been killed. Many of these people were murdered by police officers over non-violent offenses or no offenses at all. Tony McDade, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, David McAtee, Jamel Floyd, and Sean Reed are just a few of the names we must remember as this list appallingly keeps growing. This is tragically familiar territory in this country and it needs to stop. We here at Body Mechanics extend our deepest condolences to all who have been affected by these grave injustices, both past and present. We stand firmly alongside those who seek justice and systemic reform from a system that so clearly does not value human lives equally.

As healthcare providers, we recognize that systemic racism is both a moral issue and a public health issue. We recognize that the medical care you have access to, and how you are treated when you receive that care is often determined by the color of your skin. We vow to confront the pernicious racist myths and misinformation that are still highly pervasive across the medical field – because being silent is being complicit.

As New Yorkers, we recognize that our strength lies in the diversity of our community. That none of us are safe until all of us are safe. We promise to listen to our clients, coworkers, friends, family, and partners if or when they are ready to speak. We may not always have answers, but we are committed to hearing from you and supporting you however we can.

The phrase “these uncertain times” has become cliché amid the COVID-19 pandemic, so we want to make absolutely certain where we stand: Black Lives Matter

Further Reading/Resources:

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1609535

https://nymag.com/strategist/article/anti-racist-reading-list.html

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/race-and-health/

https://www.apha.org/events-and-meetings/webinars/racism-and-health

Additionally, we would like to highlight a personal perspective from Yoga Therapist and author Yuliana Kim-Grant’s personal perspective on family, racism, and the current state of events. Please take a moment to check out her deeply personal blog here. 

Our Clean Routine and Your Health

We are currently open for business, but on a limited schedule with strict health care precautions in place. We are checking in daily with our therapists and clients. If you or someone you know is sick, please stay home. Please wash before entering our space. This is a challenging time for everyone. We understand. Luckily we buy sterilization products in bulk:)

Please reach out if you have any questions.

Pain and the Zombie Apocalypse

Whether it’s another exhausting election cycle or the impending zombie apocalypse, many of us are a bit more stressed and anxious lately than usual.  Intense times, it’s totally normal to start experiencing some physical symptoms that might feel abnormal if you don’t realize their source.  Some of your old injuries might start hurting again, your back or neck may become stiffer or achier, and if you’re already dealing with some kind of pain, that may become worse.

Stress and/or anxiety can increase or decrease normal pain thresholds directly or indirectly.  Prolonged stress will tend to decrease a person’s pain threshold so that the exact same physical stimuli might become more painful than usual, or something that didn’t used to hurt might begin hurting.  People with persistent pain are often aware of how a stressful day at work can cause a flare-up, but far fewer people realize that stress and depression are two of the biggest predictors of painful flare-ups in people with acute low back pain.

Stress can also decrease pain thresholds by influencing behavior.  Most of us know that a stressful day, week, or decade can make it harder to get to sleep or stay asleep.  Lack of sleep and non-restful sleep are significant risk factors in developing physical pain and prolonging it.  Being tired can also make it far more difficult to push yourself to get some of the physical activity our bodies need to stay happy and healthy.

In these stressful times, it’s perfectly normal to begin experiencing all sorts of symptoms that might seem as if they came out of nowhere.  That’s all the more reason to take care of yourself in all the ways you can.  Spend time engaging in meaningful activities, talk to the people you care about, make time to be mindful or to relax, practice good sleep hygiene, ask for and accept more help from others, and get in some movement where you can.  You’re not broken and you’re not falling apart—we promise.

By Matthew Danziger

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4795524/?report=classic

https://journals.lww.com/spinejournal/Abstract/2018/03150/Do_Physical_Activities_Trigger_Flare_ups_During_an.14.aspx

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4046588/

The Benefits of Manual Therapy- An Interview from the Knowledge Exchange

Benefits of massage therapyOur Massage Therapist, Matt Danziger sits down with the Knowledge Exchange to talk Manual Therapy or rather what manual therapy is NOT in this blog/podcast

One of the things we pride ourselves over here at Body Mechanics Orthopedic Massage is our devotion to science and giving people a real outlook on what massage can and cannot do. We are for the most part, for what its worth science based-ish with the understanding that minds do not change over night and therapists need room and time to grow. When Matt told us that this podcast blog post was coming out we immediately asked him if we could re-post it for the Knowledge Exchange.

If you have never heard of the Knowledge Exchange, they are a professional education group that runs courses and mentor ships on the BPS model of pain (that’s Biopsychosocial if your not up on your acronym’s).  They have some wonderful online resources and blogs you can check out and they specifically define what they do as:

“We don’t see our selves as educators but rather facilitators of ideas, discussion and critical appraisal. We do this because we aren’t satisfied with the status quo of health care and believe we can all do far better for our patients.”

I do not want to give too much away in what this podcast covers but it gives some great insight into how Matt sees the role of massage in terms of fitting into the BPS framework. Frequently, a massage therapist who uses this model is viewed as anti-manual therapy and that is not the case.

You are also going to get a great look into Matt’s personal journey as a massage therapist as well as his journey with pain.

Want to check it out? Go ahead and read their post by following this link to listen to the podcast.

You can check out this blog with Adam Meakins  by the Knowledge Exchange if you want to go further into the manual therapy rabbit hole.

If you want to book with Matt and his talented mind, you can read more about Matt’s Massage therapy her or book here.

To connect to Matt’s blog follow this. 

Body Mechanics NYC

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com

Six easy ways to get the most out of your massage therapy

Want to get a great massage?  We put together a list of six super easy ways to make sure you are getting the most out of your massage therapy experience.

 

Massage can be great…it can also be miserable. Just browse through Google reviews or Yelp reviews and you will see experiences that run the gamut between amazing and horrific. In between the lines of those reviews there are frequently experiences that did not have to be bad, but were created by a series of misunderstandings or misinformation. Sure you might get a dud of a massage therapist now and again, or someone on a bad day but the majority of Massage Therapists are professionals who want to give you what you want. We put together this list of easy ways to get the most out of your massage experience to help paitents and clients navigate how to avoid some of the common problems that come up on review sites.

 

1. Arrive on time: Actually arrive 10-15 minutes early, especially if it is your first time. Frequently customers think they have purchased an hour of time. What they do not realize is that that hour of time is very specific to it’s time slot. If you booked a 5pm for one hour, your hour starts at 5 pm. Arriving at 5pm and then needing to use the restroom, fill out paper work and check in, will cut into that time. Paper work is a big time suck. Even at a gym or salon there might be some liability forms to fill out, so err on the 15 minute side of early if it is your first time at a location. Additionally you might consider asking have them send you the paper work in advance or if it can be done online. One of the big complaints we see online is that the appointment was cut short. Generally this will not happen so long as the customer has arrived with time to spare, this is literally getting the most ‘time’ out of your massage. (if it does then see suggestion number 6)

 

2.  Advocate for yourself: There are MANY different depths and styles of massage. Before most sessions your therapist will either take a medical history, ask your likes or dislikes, and what you want to focus on. Some processes are more thorough than others…but whereever you are, this is your time to speak up and make your needs known. You do NOT want someone else’s massage. You want the massage you want. If you like a head massage, let the therapist know. If you do not want your new blowout touched, let the therapist know. Asking a questions about what will be massaged and what will not be is another good way to go. “Full body” does not mean the same things to all people, so try instead to say things like “I would really like I would really like a massage that focuses on my back, legs, calves, arms and neck, I do not care so much about my hands and feet”. Clarity of words can go a long way to clearing up any misunderstandings and having an experience where your legs were mysteriously left out.

Come in with a plan. Knowing what you want ahead of time will save you time and money. If your goal is to relax, that is totally valid, but a ‘full body’ can be made very un-relaxing by your therapist chatting away. Stating what you came in for can be really helpful to both you and for your therapist in order to get what you want. Same things goes for sports massage and medical work. Let your therapist know both your long and short term goals so that they are not guessing at what you want. Some people are terrible guessers.

 

3.  If you are sick or have a possibility of a schedule change, let reception know ASAP. Most places have cancelation policy’s. Those policies are often more lenient the earlier reception knows there might be an issue. If you wake up with the sniffles or your boss throws a curve ball,  give the reception a shout as soon as you know…they might be able to do you a solid. When you wait till an hour or two before your massage because you waited to see if you could really come, you are not going to find much flexibility.

 

4.  Be forthcoming in your injury history and health history:Things that may not seem like a big deal to you, such as that trick shoulder that separates when you put your arm over head, might cause a serious problem if your therapist does not know. Sure you have had it all your life, but this is your massage therapists first time seeing it. Medications are equally important. There is no judgment, but some medications can leave you at risk for bruising, blood pressure complications, and injury. Most complications are easily avoided just by knowing the medication, so please be honest.

 

5.  Do not come in medicated, drunk or high: Massage therapists are supposed to legally send you home if you are altered in any way…and you will probably be charged a fee. Even if your therapist does take you after a few boozy lunch drinks, it may be because they are not exactly sure if you are or are not altered. The likely outcome is, they are not going to give you the massage you want, instead they are wondering if they should be sending you home and giving you the most conservative massage possible. If you have medications you’re taking for an injury and that is what your coming in to be seen for, then call ahead and ask about them. Any medicine that alters your sense of touch or judgment, is a no-go for massage because it may increase your ability to be injured.

 

6.  Complain…but start at the right place first. Businesses are not perfect. No one wants you to have a bad time. Seriously, a business is only as good as their customer service. If you had a bad experience or feel you were somehow wronged, reach out to a manager. Frequently I hear stories where a customer might have mentioned something to reception…and you should totally do that since they are sitting there, but know that not all reception knows that means you needed help. Receptions job is to take payments and greet, often they will be overtasked and not realize you complained at all, or that that complaint should be passed on. Politely asking for a managers email is totally ok, and it will get you the fastest resolution. For small businesses, they are often grateful for this approach as they WANT to find out about problems before they hit the fan. With larger businesses you may indeed have to go to social media to get someone’s attention….but this is rarely the case with self run businesses or businesses that are not chains.

Every massage is going to be a little different. It is important to keep in mind, we do this every day as massage therapists but it may be a special day for you…Hopefully this guide helps you navigate our world of massage therapy a little better.

To book an appointment, or ask us a question about our practice find us here on our Contact and booking page.

Body Mechanics NYC

1 W 34th St
#204,
New York, NY 10001
United States (US)
Phone: 212-600-4808
Email: info@bodymechanicsnyc.com